Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Fire up the app, and when you tap to take a picture, you're shunted to your phone's default camera app to take your photo. Snap it, and you're returned to Flickr to edit it. Best of all, Flickr gives you ultimate control over the licensing of your photos. You can make them public or private, license them yourself via Getty, make them remix-friendly via Creative Commons, or keep them locked down, all rights reserved to you. And contrary to previous reports, Flickr is still a buzzing social network with thousands of users and thousands more photos.

These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
LinkedIn is where you go to look for a job, but it's also a great place to network with colleagues, stay up to date on your industry, and follow influencers in your field, who can inspire you to take your career to the next level. Keep in mind, though, that LinkedIn is a professional social site, so your posts, whether they're status updates, photos, or links to articles should all be safe-for-work. LinkedIn allows you to control how others see your profile and network information as well as your profile activity.
A simple chat (slack style) it's enough. Just having the possibility to send messages either single user or team (#channel). But please don't forgive to give an useful appeal to mobile app (worst error of competitors is, have a good app but totally no mobile friendly!) i would expect to have a similar whatsapp or slack app for messaging within the slack mobile app!
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