Everyone know Twitter! This platform has gained enough popularity among users throughout the world. It allows people to create feeds with specific character limit that goes up to 140 characters. Within last few years, Twitter developers have updated so many interesting features to this network and today people love it’s all new version with feature rich design. But at the same time, many people hate this site just because its presence is somewhat same as that of Facebook. One recent update to Twitter was related to its poll creation abilities and it received great response from users. Besides the simple twitter card integration service, Twitter also allows users to share many short duration multimedia files using tweets. This platform is also popular for contests that are launched for the common people and they can participate with creative images, videos etc. The one who gets higher ranking is able to receive rewards from contest organizer.
Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
Edmodo is focused on the education sector. Social media connections between students and teachers How Facebook Plans to Disrupt Education How Facebook Plans to Disrupt Education Facebook recently made a deal with Summit Public Schools, and the implications of this partnership might change everything we know about public education. Read More are playing an increasingly important role in the classroom, but the more public and open platform of services like Facebook tempers their suitability. This has left educators looking around for Facebook alternatives.
When it comes to searching for additional sources of income to finance the project, Ello’s creators are rather creative: they have plans to begin generating revenue through user transactions carried out on their network – so by taking a commission on CD sales, for example. One of Ello’s principles is that its users aren’t obliged to use their real names, which had previously been the case at Facebook and caused outrage. When it first started out, Ello was a closed network, only accessible through an invitation to join from a registered user. This has since been relaxed, and today Ello is available for all interested parties. Critics of the site claim that Ello can’t really be considered a true Facebook alternative because it’s lacking many of the basic functions required to compete. For example, private communication between users via a chat box function is currently not possible. Ello’s focus instead is on high-quality content for all to see, making it an excellent environment for artists and photographers. Users from creative backgrounds are often attracted by Ello’s simple, minimalistic design, leaving lots of space for user posts to shine.

Lots of services can feed you the latest news. Facebook, though, displays the specific stories your friends and family are talking about. If you value that feature, Nuzzel is a great choice. You can sync the app to other social networks you might use, like Twitter and LinkedIn, and it will feed you the articles your friends, as well as friends of friends, are talking about. The app also has a "Best of Nuzzel" feature where you can see the stories being widely discussed across the whole platform.
I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
I will be 77 years old in a few weeks and the last 5 years I had built a network of friends and family of course, like everyone else, posted family pictures for posterity… anyway, was locked out due to a technicality and was so very lonely after 3 months I started a new account – my frieds were excited to reconnect and I felt like a kid in a candy store. 5 Days later am locked out again and bereft.
Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
Ello, created as a more private, ad-free alternative to Facebook, exploded in popularity in 2014 at the height of the Facebook real-name policy controversy. It's since morphed into a more Pinterest-like social networking platform for creative people: artists, musicians, photographers, and more to build brand awareness and sell their wares. What hasn't changed, however, is that unlike other more popular networking sites, Ello never sells user data, shows ads, or enforces a real-name policy.
But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
Hipstamatic differentiates itself from the crowd of retro-camera apps in four ways. First, it's not free (only one other app on this list is a paid app). Second, it features a nifty old-camera-style user interface—a spitting image of a 1970s Kodak Instamatic camera. Third, it offers group albums. And fourth, it lets you apply effects before snapping a photo, so you can preview how it will look.
I'm in the same boat. I'm as conservative as they come, but I was alarmed at all the racism and anti-Semitism over there. I started muting users over there (you can't completely block them) but now I'm realizing it may be just too hard. It's a shame since I would like to see a good Twitter alternative emerge in the future. Right now, Twitter is just too ingrained into our culture to be removed quite so easily.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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