Adobe Photoshop Express used to be among a short list of favorite photo editing apps, but a recent change that got rid of several of its more advanced effects has left some users unhappy. Nevertheless, for basic editing, it's Photoshop "lite," and you can't go wrong with that. The app has more than 20 filters, and a great corrective auto-fix feature for adjusting attributes quickly. Though there is a shooting mode, Adobe Photoshop Express 2.0 is more about touching up and enhancing images after they've been shot rather than adding extra shooting modes the way apps like Hipstamatic and Camera+ do.
Instagram is really best known for engaging the "hipster photo" scene, an appropriate term when you consider the irony involved in retro-looking images being produced digitally. Instagram's cheesy, low-grade filter effects, which some shutterflies simply abhor, let anyone with an iPhone or Android phone turn their photos back 40 years. And who could resist that slightly fuzzy 70s haze appeal (answer: anyone with an appreciation for photography as an artform).
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.

It’s early days for the app but it already has users from over 30 different countries, and there are thousands of photographers, media managers and content creators using Dayflash to share their aesthetic. We love the focus that Dayflash has on providing creators with a platform for their art, and because you can link your Instagram, the app is a nice way to get extra exposure if it’s still your go-to image sharing site.
Swipe for Facebook is a replacement for both Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger, in case you need both in one. The Chat Heads functionality is still available in this app, in case you’re a fan of that, while PiP video functionality is also included, so that you can watch videos while you’re browsing your Facebook feed. This app allows you to sort your news feed by Most Recent, if you want, while the app is available in a ton of language, similar to Fella for Facebook.

The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.
If all that has you thinking about deleting Facebook entirely, you're far from alone. (Quitting the social network is also somewhat of a first-world privilege, since for many people Facebook functions as the entire internet itself.) But going cold turkey can be hard; Facebook actually provides useful services sometimes, and there's no one-for-one replacement.

An exciting Facebook alternative that was released in 2015, but has only recently seen a huge influx of new users, is the social network, Vero. At the beginning of March 2018, for example, CEO Ayman Harari, worth billions of euros, announced an increase of more than three million users, after Vero had previously been a relatively niche app with around 200,000 active members. Not only effective influencer campaigns played an important role, but also the current offer of free lifetime membership won users over. The app, which is available for iOS, and Android, might only be available with a paid annual subscription in the future. However, the offer has been initially extended until further notice.
@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
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