Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.
If you ever share photos on Twitter, then you probably should be on Instagram. Sure, it might be owned by Facebook, and mobile-only, but with hashtag support and the ability to follow some of the biggest names in the world of entertainment The 10 Most Followed People on Instagram: Should You Follow Them Too? The 10 Most Followed People on Instagram: Should You Follow Them Too? This is not our top 10 of Instagram. It's actually the top 10 accounts based entirely on the number of followers each one of them has. Do they merit the hype? Should you follow them... Read More  to some of the best comic book artists 10 Comic Book Artists to Follow on Instagram 10 Comic Book Artists to Follow on Instagram Many comic book artists find Instagram's clean layout and ease of use is conducive to their craft. Here's a brief selection of comic artists you need to follow. Read More , it makes sense.
First let’s talk about Vero. Anyone that is leaving FB due to privacy concerns and data management concerns would be foolish to trust Vero. Ayman Hariri the founder of Vero is the son of a currupt politician from the Islamic country of Jordan, Ayman himself is personally is a currupt billionaire businessman with serious humanitarian concerns in his recent history, just check on the abandonment of his foreign workers in his former construction company. Not exactly people I would trust with my personal information, but do with it as you will.
Big Tech companies like Facebook and Twitter have taken advantage of our desire to do this. They “hooked” people then they manipulated what the users would see with algorithms. They collected every word you ever typed on social media and made assessments about you so they could sell that information to advertisers. They made a fortune off of every person who ever used their services, and deep down in the fine print, people gave them permission to do so.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
Diaspora's key advantage is that it's based on open source software that multiple servers can run. It does not put your private information, your likes, your contacts and your photos in the hands of one corporation who then use it to increase their own private profits by selling your privacy. Diaspora is much smaller though. The UI feels more like Google Plus than Facebook. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 8 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
If you remember life online before the days of Friendster, Facebook, and Myspace, this might feel familiar. Everything old is new again, as pre-Mega Social Networks, social groups would gather and collaborate in semi-private spaces that they owned, like chat rooms or forums. Over time many of these social spaces often petered out because people migrated to the bigger networks like Facebook simply because they were free to use and often easier too. Hosting and running a forum, on the other hand, takes both money and time that few people are interested in spending long-term.
Twitter, the platform I once loved, has turned into a terrible place. It's become a way to pervert the political discourse, to enable trolls, and to fuel the spread of conspiracy theories. And that's just lately. Seeing people I generally like and agree with subtweeting and attacking others—on top of the world's perpetually bleak news—has begun to gnaw away at my mental health and spiritual wellbeing. It simply isn't what I signed up for.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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