But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.
Tumblr is only a year younger than Twitter, and on April 8.2018 it hosted as many as 406.9 million blogs. Tumblr apps are available on both Android and iOS-based devices, which makes it available to the almost entire online community. The micro-blogging platform focuses on visual content more than on words, and for that reason, it has become an inexhaustible source of images that can be shared on downloaded.
Mastodon is decentralized and open to all kinds of people. It is closer to Twitter than it is to Facebook. It doesn't seem to attract the alt right like other Facebook alternatives do. I love the interface. It is very well structured and even though you join up for only one instance, you can interact with the whole world! Guest • Apr 2018 • 3 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?
I switched to facebook because it was much more simple than myspace and didn't have all the crap myspace does. But facebook is making the same mistake myspace did by adding applications that can post and even have full control over your account. Also it seems facebook is filling up with a bunch of little kids now, which is making me lose intrest in even using the site anymore.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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