It may be that ditching Facebook is not the answer, but rather restricting how your data is used and shared by the company. Facebook has just made its built-in privacy and data settings easier to use, redesigning its mobile app’s settings menu. “Instead of having settings spread across nearly 20 different screens, they’re now accessible from a single place,” it explained in a blog post announcing the change.
Facebook has been under relentless attack since the Cambridge Analytica scandal in early 2018. Broadcasters and news publishers have declared open season on Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, and other senior executives at the company. And while not quite ubiquitous, #deletefacebook pops up every time there’s a story about data privacy. The EU has fined them, the US is trying to figure out how to regulate them, and the notion that free services should be absolutely free (as opposed to checking a box on a terms and conditions page that allows the free service to use your data as payment) is gaining traction.
Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.
This is certainly an excellent alternative to Instagram, the main downside would probably be that highly saturated, HDR images seem to make up large proportion of curated lists which can lead users to be rather formulaic in their attempt to gain popularity on the site rather than being original. The reach to the masses is also no way near Instagram levels so some of your work is likely to be ignored completely.
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.

Justin. It sounds like YOU are directly responsible for why so many right thinking mind are looking for a fakebook replacement. The trend has been for a trump hater to like, then comment on a trump post. That comment is always malicious and designed to piss off trymp supporters. Eventually, the teump supporter says something in trumps defense that people like you would then report. That makes facebook determine the conservative always the offender and is then booted. No 1st ammendment with this current situation.
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
One of Facebook's most useful features isn't the main app itself, but its spinoff app Messenger. But while Messenger makes it easy to chat with Facebook friends, it's also confusing and riddled with unnecessary clutter. If you're looking for a clean and easy-to-use messaging app, try Signal. It's a free, end-to-end encrypted messaging service, approved by security researchers, that sticks to the basics. There are no animated stickers or fancy chat bots, but Signal does an excellent job of keeping you securely connected to your friends and family.
Another idea is to purchase an old school video cam and record real, permanent, physical video on cassette or reel-to-reel. You could also start a video/photo library made of SIM cards from your digital devices so you always have an original hard copy which you can upload to social media at any time without worrying about permanently losing it. I don’t know how much of my life I’ve wasted online, but It’s been too much.
It's very much like Twitter with a character limit of 500, except there's not *one* website you have to trust, but you can choose the mastodon server ("instance") that you trust and they are linked, so you can follow people from other instances. The instances all have their own rules, so you can pick a place with as few or many rules as you are comfortable with. mrmbl • May 2017 • 12 agrees and 5 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Some Facebook alternatives focus more on local features. Nextdoor is about connecting users with the people in their real-life community – where they live – while Raftr takes the approach of linking people who are interested in the same topics or activities, wherever they are in the world. Boot-sale app Shpock, meanwhile, already arguably does a better job than Facebook’s Marketplace feature at being a more-local eBay.
But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.
TweetDeck, now owned by Twitter, is a desktop powerhouse that tries to bring the same multi-column, quick filtering functionality to the iPhone. Favored by social media marketing, analyst, and engagement types because of the ability to sort, organize, manage, and push out tons of Twitter material, the approach translates down to the much smaller screen with okay but not great results.

Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.

People who enjoy sharing a photo on Twitter from time to time should switch to Instagram because the platform provides much more photo editing features. In addition to amazing photo effects you can use on Instagram, you can post videos, which last up to sixty seconds or Stories that also last less than one minute. The platform's aspect ratio restrictions have been lifted so, you can post square, horizontally and vertically oriented images or videos.
Faster for Facebook Lite is one of the newer Facebook apps. It uses the lighter and less resource intensive Facebook Lite as its template instead of the usual Facebook. The app includes Facebook and Facebook Messenger support, it can view all kinds of content like video and GIFs, and you can change to classic Facebook mode if needed. It's a web wrapper like most Facebook apps. However, the dark mode and all-in-one experience are definitely nice. The premium version goes for $2.99 and that's a perfectly reasonable price for it. It's better than most.
Trolls, haters, racists... are on every social network. Gab also have racists. Mastodon blocks nazis and allows you to create your own social network. The best alternatives to social media are web hosting sites, blogs, file uploading and file mirroring websites and link bookmarking websites. They don't store too much personal data and there is no trolls, spammers and haters.
Where you find all your favourite movies and video clips? Probably, on YouTube! Most of the video lovers throughout the world prefer to use YouTube as their favourite video watching and downloading site. The great news is that YouTube has received second largest search engines ranking after Google. However, YouTube is also owned by Google but still it is able to make a stand alone powerful identify among users. It is the premiere place for entertainment, marketing and sharing emotions with compelling stories. Ranging between vlogs to independent films and video clips as well as movies, everything is present on YouTube with high content quality. The only trouble you may find on YouTube videos is the annoying ads that can appear anywhere between videos. But the best solution to get rid of these unwanted ads is to switch to YouTube Red that is premium subscription plan of YouTube.
The beautifully designed Camera+ app gives users more shooting options and better effects than they'll find with the native iOS Camera app. The app's area of expertise is in snapping the best photo possible from the get-go, which it does with the aid of shooting options like the stabilizer, timer, burst mode, and separate exposure and focus points.
Steemit is still a work in progress, and new features are being added constantly. For example, Steemit recently changed many underpinnings of how the network operates in order to help onboard new users faster. (Sometimes there is a waiting period before a new account is approved.) Stone told Heavy: “Hardfork 20 is going to improve the account creation process and user experience (post editing and voting, specifically) on Steemit and other decentralized apps on the Steem blockchain.”
Records, and earned 82,000 equivalent album units in the week ending March 28, according to Nielsen Music. Of that sum, 24,000 were in album sales. Bad Habits is the second full-length studio album for the 29-year-old NAV. The Toronto-born rapper, who signed to fellow Toronto native The Weeknd’s XO imprint in 2017, earlier logged three entries on the Billboard 200 chart. NAV (real name: Navraj Singh Goraya) previously visited the top 10 with his debut studio set, Reckless, which debuted and peaked at No. 8 on the June 2, 2018-dated chart. He also logged entries with the collaborative mixtape Perfect Timing with Metro Boomin (No. 13 on Aug. 12, 2017) and his self-titled mixtape (No. 24 on March 18, 2017). Bad Habits was powered by streaming activity, as it collected 57,000 SEA units in its opening frame. That sum equates to 79.08 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs in its first week, making the set the most-streamed album
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