This is the best photo editing app you can get on the iPhone for free. It works really well and rivals Camera+ in the features department with a number of great vintage filters that will give your photos a unique look. Extra packs of filters only cost $1. Like Snapseed, it’s available on multiple platforms so you can get the same experience no matter what device you’re on.
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.
Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.
Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).
For more general news that can delight and surprise, try Digg, an aggregation site that prioritizes deeply reported features on a range of topics as well as lots of fun and quirky news stories. And of course, iPhone and iPad owners can always just fire up Apple News if they don't want to bother setting up a whole new system. None of those fit the bill? Here's a deeper look at Facebook News Feed alternatives.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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