Twitter took Facebook's most fundamental feature—the status update—and spun it off into its own app. It's since become a platform for celebrities and politicians to post their every thought, photo, and video. Many of these become news stories in and of themselves. Speaking of news, Twitter has become an excellent news feed as most media organizations post breaking news stories there. Just make sure you're following publications you trust and avoid the comments and replies in most cases. On Twitter, you can also broadcast your 280-character thoughts publicly or make your account private so only the followers you accept can see your activity.
Users are allowed to self-censor by flagging (although flagging is discouraged), and they vote on the merits of a post through upvotes, much like you would “like” a Facebook post or upvote a Reddit submission. But the big thing that makes Steemit stand out is that you get paid for your posts in the form of Steem cryptocurrency, based on how many votes your posts get. And you also get paid based on your own curation of other people’s posts, and the upvotes that your comments on posts receive.
It’s an interesting system that is flawed in a few ways. First off, Minds user base isn’t quite large enough to really incentivize you to reach as many users as possible via tokens. As such, you’re still kind of better off using your promotion time on Twitter and Facebook. Even if your content gets sucked into the void, it still feels like you’re getting more attention on popular platforms.
Not just Facebook but Twitter as well. What I see unfolding in front of my very eyes is an evolutionary process still in beta that is already much superior to both of the above. Complex but clean, fast growing yet still user friendly and last but not least, the community feels real. They talk about important things instead of pretending to be celebs. I sense an intellectual depth ib the Minds community. Cheers Minds!! AJ JPS andrew_jjps • Apr 2017 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Twitter also suffers from bad publicity as extremists had consistently used it for political persuasions, and no, we are not talking about just Trump. There are trolls, religious groups, terrorists, criminals and other tons of accounts that are being used for public manipulation. There are celebrities who are stuck with millions of followers and nowhere else to go. Twitter has become a mess with a handful of active celebrities and politicians, and if you too are looking for a Twitter alternative where you can engage in positive ideas and conversations, share media files with friends and families, this list might be of some help. Here is a quick rundown.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.

An exciting Facebook alternative that was released in 2015, but has only recently seen a huge influx of new users, is the social network, Vero. At the beginning of March 2018, for example, CEO Ayman Harari, worth billions of euros, announced an increase of more than three million users, after Vero had previously been a relatively niche app with around 200,000 active members. Not only effective influencer campaigns played an important role, but also the current offer of free lifetime membership won users over. The app, which is available for iOS, and Android, might only be available with a paid annual subscription in the future. However, the offer has been initially extended until further notice.
Arguably, this has been a long time coming. A multitude of changes that regular users saw no need for, confusing direction and changes at the top (founder Jack Dorsey left, then returned) have left Twitter’s raison d’etre somewhat confused. Is Twitter really for social networking, or is it for microblogging? Or, as the results of a 2016 survey show, is it best used for contacting customer services departments of major manufacturers and retailers?

For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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