Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
If you want to make your photos look great, there’s no app that I’d recommend more than Snapseed. Yes, the app has a bunch of vintage filters if you’re into that sort of thing, but there are so many ways you can edit your photos using Snapseed beyond mere filters. Selective Adjustments are a key feature that really separate Snapseed from competitors because it allows you to take complete control of your photos. There are even OS X and Windows versions of the app so you can use it on your preferred platform. Don’t let the $4.99 price tag scare you away because Snapseed for iPhone or iPad is worth every penny.
If you want to make your photos look great, there’s no app that I’d recommend more than Snapseed. Yes, the app has a bunch of vintage filters if you’re into that sort of thing, but there are so many ways you can edit your photos using Snapseed beyond mere filters. Selective Adjustments are a key feature that really separate Snapseed from competitors because it allows you to take complete control of your photos. There are even OS X and Windows versions of the app so you can use it on your preferred platform. Don’t let the $4.99 price tag scare you away because Snapseed for iPhone or iPad is worth every penny.
Diaspora is a nonprofit social networking platform similar to Instagram that you can share your status, images, and see other people’s comment on the material. This tool also ensures the users that it will not sell its member’s information to advertisers. However, unlike the other social networking programs above, it has few users. This program is not widely known in many countries.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.

SlimSocial for Facebook is one of the lightest Facebook alternative apps, it weighs less than 400KB, and it’s free to use. This app does not come with ads, at least not its own, you will see Facebook’s feed ads, though. The design is quite simple, reminiscent of the mobile Facebook app, and the app works really well, even though the developer notes that the app is in development, and that some features may not work as intended. This is a final version of the app despite what the developer's note says, so feel free to try it out.

2. Was ich nicht tue ist mich mit jeweils einen Acount zu begnügen. Mein Bedarf wäre eigentlich eher ein totale Unterschied zwischen Login in eine Plattform und deren Nutzung. So habe ich je nach Funktion 6 verschiedene identi.ca-Accounts und mehr als 10 verschiedene Blogs. Ich bin immer sehr verwirrt darüber, dass ich für jeden neuen Account eine neue Mailadresse brauche. D.h. ich trenne sehr stark Inhalte. Das ist nocht immer einfach, aber ich brauche das irgendwie. Das ist sowohl für die Abonnenten als auch für mich einfacher zu sortieren. So wie mehrere Ordner unterhalb einer IMAP‐​Inbox.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
Ello launched back in 2014 with quite a stir in the US as it was about the time when Facebook changed its policy on names of its members, where they had to use their proper legal name. Its popularity grew as Ello presented itself to the world as a “Facebook killer social network” which doesn’t push ads down its users’ throats and doesn’t sell peoples’ information and data to 3rd parties.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.

A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.

Free speech supporters are going to love using Gab.ai, a social network that has had their mobile app banned from both Google Play and the App Store, for failing to comply with their policies on adult content. Be it as it may, Gab.ai still offers shelter to people who think that hate speech or non-art related public nudity is somehow okay in the public domain. However, you really have to look for unsavory content, and most of the posts on the platform are dedicated to memes, pop culture or art.


At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Twitter has become a cultural icon since being introduced in 2006. Even President Donald Trump of the United States has gained notoriety for his use of Twitter. Users of the platform are able to send "tweets" which can be no longer than 280 characters. This is double the original limit of 140 characters. In some Asian languages, 140 characters remains the standard.
It may be that ditching Facebook is not the answer, but rather restricting how your data is used and shared by the company. Facebook has just made its built-in privacy and data settings easier to use, redesigning its mobile app’s settings menu. “Instead of having settings spread across nearly 20 different screens, they’re now accessible from a single place,” it explained in a blog post announcing the change.
A simple chat (slack style) it's enough. Just having the possibility to send messages either single user or team (#channel). But please don't forgive to give an useful appeal to mobile app (worst error of competitors is, have a good app but totally no mobile friendly!) i would expect to have a similar whatsapp or slack app for messaging within the slack mobile app!
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