It also has a desktop version, allowing you to sync messages between your computer and phone, just like on Messenger. Signal can import your contacts, so it's easy to start a thread with anyone you already have saved in your phone. Signal also has several additional security features that might come in handy if you're aiming to avoid surveillance, like the ability to set messages to delete after a certain amount of time. You can also use Signal to make voice and video calls, just like on Messenger. There are absolutely no advertisements, and the app does not collect your personal information.
It brings the best of both Instagram and Facebook together into one beautiful app for sharing everything from photos and videos, to music and books. And if you ever find yourself overwhelmed with too many friends on Path, you can take advantage of the convenient "Inner Circle" feature to bring you back to your connections with those you care about most.
I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
SlimSocial is a newer Facebook app that keeps it wicked simple. Its claim to fame is its intensely small size (100KB), that it shows no ads, and that it’s open source so you can go view the source code and contribute to its development if you want to. Aside from that, there isn’t much to talk about. It'll be a little slow and clunky like many third party apps. It's not that bad, though. The developer has also expressed interest in adding new features down the road like background notifications along with more stuff. .
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
People who enjoy sharing a photo on Twitter from time to time should switch to Instagram because the platform provides much more photo editing features. In addition to amazing photo effects you can use on Instagram, you can post videos, which last up to sixty seconds or Stories that also last less than one minute. The platform's aspect ratio restrictions have been lifted so, you can post square, horizontally and vertically oriented images or videos.

It's very much like Twitter with a character limit of 500, except there's not *one* website you have to trust, but you can choose the mastodon server ("instance") that you trust and they are linked, so you can follow people from other instances. The instances all have their own rules, so you can pick a place with as few or many rules as you are comfortable with. mrmbl • May 2017 • 12 agrees and 5 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Tumblr is only a year younger than Twitter, and on April 8.2018 it hosted as many as 406.9 million blogs. Tumblr apps are available on both Android and iOS-based devices, which makes it available to the almost entire online community. The micro-blogging platform focuses on visual content more than on words, and for that reason, it has become an inexhaustible source of images that can be shared on downloaded.
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.
We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.
Minds is an open source alternative to Facebook that values freedom of speech above all else. They do not censor post or videos because they disagree with them. Minds has a built in blogging system as well as video uploads. Best of all is Minds ability to use points to buy views for your post, enabling self-advertising on the site! Guest • Mar 2017 • 6 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree

I have always loved Facebook but lately they are removing some of my posts. I only share pictures if my family, and post things to make friends laugh, recipes, whats going on in my life and my feeling. I loved the memories feature, photos, being able to accessorize my page. I don’t know which direction to turn. I don’t post political issues because I feel we all have a right to there option.
GLOBAL NO.1 - 30 YEARS AGO... Madonna is known for her blatant style- and taboo breaks. With the release of the lead single 'Like A Prayer' for the album of the same name, she came with really heavy guns: a 180 ° image turn-around from the blonde beast to a meekly brunette ... her music changed into an exalted, hymn-like and danceable sound with religious-controversial and provocative texts. But the big bone of contention was the music video, directed by Mary Lambert. It portrays Madonna as a witness to the murder of a girl by white supremacists. While a black man is arrested for the murder, Madonna hides in a church for safety seeking strength to go forth as a witness. The clip depicts a church and Catholic symbols such as stigmata. It also features a Ku Klux Klan-style cross burning, and a dream about kissing a black saint. The Vatican condemned the video, while family and religious groups protested against its broadcast. They boycotted products by soft drink manufacturer Pepsi, who had used the song in their commercial. The company canceled their sponsorship contract with Madonna, but allowed her to retain the fee. 'Like A Prayer' became, not least because of this rather unintentionally publicity through the condemnation of parent associations and church representatives, the world's biggest hit in 1989.
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