Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
Users can upload images and videos and use them to tell a story using various layout templates. If you want to tell a story with a series of images, you can then add new videos or images before sharing them. These images can then be seen in the ‘storyline’ feed along with any other stories that a particular user follows. Other users can like and comment on posts in the exact same way as on Instagram, and can also share them to other social media platforms: as can you.

Twitter took Facebook's most fundamental feature—the status update—and spun it off into its own app. It's since become a platform for celebrities and politicians to post their every thought, photo, and video. Many of these become news stories in and of themselves. Speaking of news, Twitter has become an excellent news feed as most media organizations post breaking news stories there. Just make sure you're following publications you trust and avoid the comments and replies in most cases. On Twitter, you can also broadcast your 280-character thoughts publicly or make your account private so only the followers you accept can see your activity.
SlimSocial is a newer Facebook app that keeps it wicked simple. Its claim to fame is its intensely small size (100KB), that it shows no ads, and that it’s open source so you can go view the source code and contribute to its development if you want to. Aside from that, there isn’t much to talk about. It'll be a little slow and clunky like many third party apps. It's not that bad, though. The developer has also expressed interest in adding new features down the road like background notifications along with more stuff. .
There are also sister “apps” to Steemit that work within the Steem blockchain. These include DTube (a YouTube alternative), DMania (getting paid for memes), DLive (for live streaming) and Zappl (a Twitter alternative.) My very first Zap just read: “This is my very first Zappl and I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing,” and it earned me six cents. You can learn more about these apps by reading the Steemit story here. Steemit also has an active “in person” community, including a Steem Creators Conference that’s coming to Las Vegas in mid-April.
Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
IMDB is the go-to website for movie lovers and deservedly so. It’s a great website where you can read reviews of a movie from various users and rate movies you’ve just watched. Along with that, you can also discuss various movies on the “Message Board” with the very cool community. There’s also IMDBPro, if you want to get in touch with an actor or artist.
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.

This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.

App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
With Google’s messaging apps a real mess right now (Hangouts is good but rarely used), and Facebook in charge of Instagram and WhatsApp, the other genuine alternatives are Signal and Telegram. We prefer the former for its stronger encryption, but they both do messages, calls, media, groups, and more. Whichever you pick though, you’ve then got the job of trying to get all your friends to switch too.
Puffin for Facebook is by the same developers that made Puffin Browser. This is a browser app specifically made for Facebook. It features data compression that allows you to surf Facebook while using less data and also includes a tweaked UI for more enjoyable browsing. It works better on lower-end devices on slower network connections. Those with faster connections and newer phones may have a better experience with a different app. It's completely free with no in-app purchases.
Firstly, you can make all of your images available for purchase through the EyeEm app. EyeEm do this via Getty, take a handsome cut for the trouble, and you must have model and location releases as per other stock photography selling sites. But I must hand it to the EyeEm team, it is wonderfully simple to submit your photography for review to go on sale, and the app itself is enjoyable to browse.
The platform Diaspora is a social world online that puts your data back in your own hands, according to its own slogan. Its range of functions is similar to those of Facebook. Users can publish status updates, share posts and images, and comment on other people’s posts. And just like on Facebook, you can control who gets to see your own posts as well. Diaspora uses hashtags to order posts, meaning that you can use these to find like-minded people who share your interests. Linking Diaspora to your Facebook profile is also possible, and the software has its own chat function. Diaspora is also an open source project.
In truth, there are entirely reasonable discussions on Gab; the distasteful stuff you would have to go looking for. If anything, it is perhaps a good argument against online anonymity. All of this controversy is a shame, as the Gab platform is really good, giving you 300 character status updates. The site feels like a combination of Facebook and Twitter, and Gabs can be automatically shared to Twitter (should you want to).
Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.
Facebook hasn't been very fun for the last few years. From political fighting to fake news to privacy concerns, many users are logging on less and others are deleting their accounts altogether. For those who primarily use Facebook today but are looking for alternatives, we've put together a list of the best options—from the most popular challengers to a few of the latest upstarts.
Swipe for Facebook is a replacement for both Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger, in case you need both in one. The Chat Heads functionality is still available in this app, in case you’re a fan of that, while PiP video functionality is also included, so that you can watch videos while you’re browsing your Facebook feed. This app allows you to sort your news feed by Most Recent, if you want, while the app is available in a ton of language, similar to Fella for Facebook.
One feature that’s specific to the business model for EyeEm is that users can offer their own photos voluntarily on the startup’s marketplace. EyeEm sells these images with stock licenses to Getty Images and other purchasers. Users then receive a share of the revenue generated. This means that EyeEm isn’t just a platform for displaying images – you can make money from them too. And it’s not just an incentive for the user to post as high-quality photographic content as possible: the social network itself requires this in order to finance its business through advertising.
One of Facebook's most useful features isn't the main app itself, but its spinoff app Messenger. But while Messenger makes it easy to chat with Facebook friends, it's also confusing and riddled with unnecessary clutter. If you're looking for a clean and easy-to-use messaging app, try Signal. It's a free, end-to-end encrypted messaging service, approved by security researchers, that sticks to the basics. There are no animated stickers or fancy chat bots, but Signal does an excellent job of keeping you securely connected to your friends and family.

BuddyPress can be a Facebook alternative, depending on your needs. It's a Wordpress add-on, which means if you self-host or have hosted for you a Wordpress blog or website, you can add BP to enable you to create a social network of your own. Do it on your server and keep your privacy! JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 4 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.
@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
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