A press release about the change, which was just implemented at the end of September, reads that this is “a software upgrade that will take the Steem blockchain from its current bandwidth system to a new system based on Resource Credits, or RCs. This upgrade will enable Steem DApps to create free accounts, making it easier than ever to onboard new users and cementing Steem’s lead as the blockchain with the lowest barriers-to-entry… Hardfork 20 also improves user experiences on Steem by enabling unlimited post editing on steemit.com, allowing curators to vote on a post within 15 minutes of it being published (a change from 30 minutes) and putting more rewards back in the hands of curators by removing an unfair advantage that self-voting authors had.”
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
BuddyPress can be a Facebook alternative, depending on your needs. It's a Wordpress add-on, which means if you self-host or have hosted for you a Wordpress blog or website, you can add BP to enable you to create a social network of your own. Do it on your server and keep your privacy! JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 4 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...

Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.


Faster for Facebook Lite is one of the newer Facebook apps. It uses the lighter and less resource intensive Facebook Lite as its template instead of the usual Facebook. The app includes Facebook and Facebook Messenger support, it can view all kinds of content like video and GIFs, and you can change to classic Facebook mode if needed. It's a web wrapper like most Facebook apps. However, the dark mode and all-in-one experience are definitely nice. The premium version goes for $2.99 and that's a perfectly reasonable price for it. It's better than most.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.

The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree


Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.

While Path isn’t necessarily a true competitor to Instagram, it has many of the same features. You can capture photos in the app, apply filters, export them to other apps, or post them on your stream for friends to view. Most of the privacy concerns surrounding Path have been resolved, and it offers a very intimate approach to sharing. Rather than imploring you to build an army of followers, Path strives to keep things intimate by sharing photos with the people you care about most. The photo-editing features aren’t as good as the other apps mentioned here, but as a social network it is argueably a better experience than Instagram.
 You will be amazed to know that Instagram allows users to upload about thousands of images on its platform within few seconds. It can instantly connect you to many other networking sites too like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr etc for easy sharing of stories. The best part is that this platform is not just limited to Photo sharing rather it can also be used for sharing eye catching videos but the maximum supported time duration for videos is 15 seconds only. Instagram also allows people to follow others like most of the social media applications. Users can customize their account settings with ease so that privacy of all uploaded photos or videos can be maintained.
Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.
Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
No corporate censorship. As Big Tech®™? censors and deplatforms more users for the tiniest of infractions, Gab will grow. It has its issues (UI needs improvement, needs a “media” tab like Twitter has). I’ve had my account for two years. Not a single lockout, suspension, or forced deletion of my posts. I’m done with Twitter. Guest • Aug 2018 • 12 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
From the planning side, collecting peoples' contact info can be a pain, sure. But that's a one-time bother. From there, use Paperless Post for beautiful and functional email invites and RSVP tracking. And for more rote calendar-coordination, use Doodle to find the best day for a dinner or meeting that works for everyone. The site lets each guest respond with a time that works for them, so you can easily figure out how best to accommodate everyone's schedule.
@Corvin Adkins: I completely agree. My team and I use Podio and the internal chat is useful for general communication. And even though it integrates with Slack, I don't want my team to have to switch between apps to chat. It would be counter productive. We would love to migrate to Clickup but wouldn't be able to until it had the current features that our team is using on Podio at minimum.
×