I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.


The annual fee, however, is intended to help out the developing company, Vero Labs, by being its main source of income. The idea is for the platform to remain free of advertising in the long run and not to share any user information to make a profit. In addition, the company wants to generate revenue through transaction fees that merchants have to pay when selling products through Vero and implementing the 'buy now' button.
Another idea is to purchase an old school video cam and record real, permanent, physical video on cassette or reel-to-reel. You could also start a video/photo library made of SIM cards from your digital devices so you always have an original hard copy which you can upload to social media at any time without worrying about permanently losing it. I don’t know how much of my life I’ve wasted online, but It’s been too much.
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.

If you think your images are sellable, EyeEm is the app for you. This smart platform allows you to publish your favorite photos, which image buyers, media outlets and big brands can then browse and potentially buy. What makes this image sharing platform different from regular stock sites is that it still has that Insta-community feel, and it’s an equally excellent place to go for inspiration.
If you're friends with hundreds or thousands of people on Facebook, it understandably might not be worthwhile to put them all in your Gcal. In this case, it might be easiest just to take 20 minutes or so to add your close friends and family member's special days to your calendar. And really, did the annual onslaught of best wishes on Facebook add much to your life in the first place?
SlimSocial for Facebook is one of the lightest Facebook alternative apps, it weighs less than 400KB, and it’s free to use. This app does not come with ads, at least not its own, you will see Facebook’s feed ads, though. The design is quite simple, reminiscent of the mobile Facebook app, and the app works really well, even though the developer notes that the app is in development, and that some features may not work as intended. This is a final version of the app despite what the developer's note says, so feel free to try it out.
LinkedIn is where you go to look for a job, but it's also a great place to network with colleagues, stay up to date on your industry, and follow influencers in your field, who can inspire you to take your career to the next level. Keep in mind, though, that LinkedIn is a professional social site, so your posts, whether they're status updates, photos, or links to articles should all be safe-for-work. LinkedIn allows you to control how others see your profile and network information as well as your profile activity.
Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
Named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Technology, Shelly Palmer is CEO of The Palmer Group, a strategy, design and engineering firm focused at the nexus of technology, media and marketing. He is Fox 5 New York's on-air tech and digital media expert, writes a weekly column for AdAge, and is a regular commentator on CNBC and CNN. Follow @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com or subscribe to our daily email http://ow.ly/WsHcb
Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
There are no ads, and the service promises "no data mining. Ever." That means it won't try to sell you stuff based on your interests and habits, as revealed through your posts. Of course, Facebook started out without ads and "data mining," and it's now one of the top internet advertising companies. Facebook bought Instagram in 2012 and started showing ads there the following year.
We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.

The annual fee, however, is intended to help out the developing company, Vero Labs, by being its main source of income. The idea is for the platform to remain free of advertising in the long run and not to share any user information to make a profit. In addition, the company wants to generate revenue through transaction fees that merchants have to pay when selling products through Vero and implementing the 'buy now' button.
While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.
Before Snapseed there was Camera+. Its photoediting features are a lot better than Instagram’s, and even though it’s not as fully featured as Snapseed, you might like it more because it’s cheaper and bit easier to use. Other than the great filters provided, the best thing about Camera+ is the ability to capture photos by setting the exposure at a different point than the focus (something most camera apps don’t let you do). For only $0.99 Camera+ might be the most cost effective Instagram alternative.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..

Hipstamatic differentiates itself from the crowd of retro-camera apps in four ways. First, it's not free (only one other app on this list is a paid app). Second, it features a nifty old-camera-style user interface—a spitting image of a 1970s Kodak Instamatic camera. Third, it offers group albums. And fourth, it lets you apply effects before snapping a photo, so you can preview how it will look.
Mit dem Einsatz digitaler Medien überwindet es geografische Distanzen zwischen Menschen und bietet die Möglichkeit zu authentischen Begegnungen. Schulklassen in Deutschland bekommen die Chance, sich in einem Computer-Chat mit Schulklassen oder Einzelpersonen im Globalen Süden auszutauschen. Ebenso haben Schulklassen aus dem Globalen Süden die Möglichkeit, mit Schulklassen und Einzelpersonen in Deutschland in Kontakt zu kommen.
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