@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
There are no ads, and the service promises "no data mining. Ever." That means it won't try to sell you stuff based on your interests and habits, as revealed through your posts. Of course, Facebook started out without ads and "data mining," and it's now one of the top internet advertising companies. Facebook bought Instagram in 2012 and started showing ads there the following year.
For those determined to exit the Facebook ecosystem, the best approach is more likely to be a patchwork of sites and apps that mirror individual features. Messaging is the easiest: apps such as Telegram and Signal offer messaging and group chats, as well as voice calls, with encryption to keep your communications private. Telegram even has a thriving collection of chatbots, similar to Facebook Messenger.
With the increasing popularity of digital media, Facebook is also becoming fun home to all social media lovers. There are so many interesting features inside this user friendly and highly interactive platform but cons are also present. At one side, millions of users stay actively connected to Facebook but on the other side, it also faces criticism. The biggest issue is privacy control options on Facebook. Anyone can check your all details while visiting your profile and they can even download your photos without taking any permission from you. Such issues are worth considerable and this is the main reason behind why people are searching for potential Facebook Alternatives. If you are already bored with Facebook App and now want to take a step ahead to more fun then choose any of these Facebook alternatives as discussed below:

You can capture and edit images in the app, and there are plenty of filters on offer, but the main aim is to share your content. Followers can favorite your images and can also republish them, but there are no options for comments and there is less of a focus on winning ‘likes’. In fact, the amount of followers that every user has is hidden, so it’s a completely level playing field for novices and professionals alike. The ‘discover’ section of the app makes it easy to find and follow photographers, making it a great place to gather inspiration and broaden your photography skills.
Adobe Photoshop Express used to be among a short list of favorite photo editing apps, but a recent change that got rid of several of its more advanced effects has left some users unhappy. Nevertheless, for basic editing, it's Photoshop "lite," and you can't go wrong with that. The app has more than 20 filters, and a great corrective auto-fix feature for adjusting attributes quickly. Though there is a shooting mode, Adobe Photoshop Express 2.0 is more about touching up and enhancing images after they've been shot rather than adding extra shooting modes the way apps like Hipstamatic and Camera+ do.
If you want an app like Instagram and doesn’t stray too far from the formula, then Oggl is one to check out. This service comes from the same people who created Hipstamatic, the popular vintage camera app The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Hipstamatic The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Hipstamatic The iPhone photography app Hipstamatic can be a little overwhelming at first, trying to understand how all the different combinations work and what kind of effects you can create using the app. When you first... Read More from years ago.
Diaspora's key advantage is that it's based on open source software that multiple servers can run. It does not put your private information, your likes, your contacts and your photos in the hands of one corporation who then use it to increase their own private profits by selling your privacy. Diaspora is much smaller though. The UI feels more like Google Plus than Facebook. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 8 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

What about Ello or Diaspora? I have been getting kicked completely out of Facebook and I have had to delete my app several times. And I know that I have let my friends on Facebook know that I was looking for something outside of Facebook. My Aunt as well as a few others are looking too. But I told them as soon as I find something I would let them know. I don’t think I should be discriminated against for being conservative and this to is happening on Facebook as well.


All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
MeWe bills itself as the ad-free, spyware-free, and censorship-free social network. Share your photos, videos, voice messages, GIFs, memes, and more to just one person, a specific group, or all your contacts. You can also send people disappearing GIFs and photos. Either way, MeWe won't track you. If you want to send end-to-end encrypted chats, however, it'll cost you 99 cents per month or $5.99 per year.
Tweetbot is different. It’s innovative and refreshing. Tweetbot isn’t an app you use, it’s one you interact with. Everything has an animation, a sound, a beautiful interface. And true to Tapbots’ style, the sounds are subtle and pleasant – enriching the experience. For those who are suckers for design, innovation, and dare I say, personality, Tweetbot will rock your world.

There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
It's full of inspiration, it's clean and it's wonderfully simple to use. If you are looking for a unique way of to publish a collection of images and give them an editorial feel very quickly, Steller is the place to be. Steller has also been slow in building an active following, but much like SW/NG, I hope that the developers persist as there is certainly enough room in the market for well thought out image sharing apps like Steller.
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
EyeEm lets users snap new photos directly, or import images from the Camera Roll. There’s a feature in EyeEm, Picked by EyeEm Selects, that scans your images and picks out photos with the highest aesthetic score, according to their algorithm. It’s safe and completely private, since the scanning is just done on your mobile device, not on their servers.
Streamzoo adds a social-gaming element to an otherwise ordinary Instagram-like photo-filtering app. Users can follow popular "#streams" with the use of a hashtag, and as their photos become more popular, they earn badges and compete against others. More social features let you share photos privately with a group of people you invite, or post your pictures to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr and Flickr.
Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...
With Google’s messaging apps a real mess right now (Hangouts is good but rarely used), and Facebook in charge of Instagram and WhatsApp, the other genuine alternatives are Signal and Telegram. We prefer the former for its stronger encryption, but they both do messages, calls, media, groups, and more. Whichever you pick though, you’ve then got the job of trying to get all your friends to switch too.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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