Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.


There you have it. Four great—if not better—alternatives to Instagram. I admit, I don't hate the app as much as I implied earlier, but it's difficult to watch great apps and alternatives get swept under the rug simply because of trendiness and flash rather than substance and features. Still, you may not agree with me—perhaps you've used one of these apps and still prefer Instagram, if only to make iOS users angry? Perhaps there's a killer Instagram feature I've overlooked, or a killer alternative worth mentioning? Whatever you think, agree or disagree, share your thoughts in the discussions below.
Users can upload images and videos and use them to tell a story using various layout templates. If you want to tell a story with a series of images, you can then add new videos or images before sharing them. These images can then be seen in the ‘storyline’ feed along with any other stories that a particular user follows. Other users can like and comment on posts in the exact same way as on Instagram, and can also share them to other social media platforms: as can you.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
Whether he’s planning a book, an exhibition, or an editorial or commercial client, Cole Barash puts a lot of thought into sequencing and is always aware that the arrangement of images will influence their meaning. As Barash explains in our story on visual storytelling on social media (“Social Media Strategy: Cole Barash on Sequencing Personal and Assignment Work“), he is...
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.

Of course, there are so many great things about Twitter. The problem is, those great things are available elsewhere. If you’re looking for positive conversation and exploration of ideas, niche, geeky interests, or a means to share music, video, or photos, the following Twitter alternatives are worth your time. Like Twitter, they all offer mobile apps, so you can stay connected 24/7.
Tumblr is another free social networking platform like Instagram. It is famous for offering its microblogging interaction. Unlike some other social networking platforms, on Tumblr, you can only create a short content post where members can post text, images, videos, links, and audio files. Moreover, this program is available in all popular mobile operating systems. It is also accessible on Mac and Windows PC. The dashboard feature of this app allows the users to search blogs or visit and follow other users easily.
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
It is good to read these comments. I am also looking for somewhere else to go. I do not like what fb is doing either. I have been reading some on these othe websites and as for me, i think i will try Mastodon. I like the things i have read about it. Good luck to everyone that is deciding to go somewhere else. Because it isn’t right that fb is trying to control everybody.
It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
As another safety net, Edmodo also lets parents join the network. Doing so differentiates it from cyberbullying-ridden apps such as After School 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App Plenty of children use the After School app, but there are some solid reasons why parents should steer their kids clear of it. Read More . By joining, parents can engage in the learning process and coordinate their efforts with teachers and professors.

If you have never heard of this social network you may be getting a bit old, because most users of Musical.ly are aged between 13 and 18. Even though teenagers use it, the platform provides some interesting and amusing features that foster artistic expression and allow you to share your creative output with millions of people. Twitter users often share songs and videos posted on Musical.ly, so why not leave Twitter and start sharing your own creative content on this social media network.
I switched to facebook because it was much more simple than myspace and didn't have all the crap myspace does. But facebook is making the same mistake myspace did by adding applications that can post and even have full control over your account. Also it seems facebook is filling up with a bunch of little kids now, which is making me lose intrest in even using the site anymore.
Tweetbot by Tapbots is it a beauty. A text review can hardly do this app justice because it is impossible to put into words how beautifully Tweetbot is made. Sure, I can describe how, at your touch, a tweet slides up revealing a navigation bar while simultaneous emitting the perfect sound. I can explain that swiping a tweet to right reveals the conversation and swiping to left displays related tweets. I can tell you about smart gestures, multiple timelines, and customizable navigation. I can even spew out a concrete list of every feature that Tweetbot includes. What I can’t provide you, however, is the experience.

Twitter took Facebook's most fundamental feature—the status update—and spun it off into its own app. It's since become a platform for celebrities and politicians to post their every thought, photo, and video. Many of these become news stories in and of themselves. Speaking of news, Twitter has become an excellent news feed as most media organizations post breaking news stories there. Just make sure you're following publications you trust and avoid the comments and replies in most cases. On Twitter, you can also broadcast your 280-character thoughts publicly or make your account private so only the followers you accept can see your activity.
And if all else fails, there is always the option to revisit old social haunts. Myspace still exists, albeit as a mish-mash of pop-culture news and dormant profiles of friends who have not logged in since its relaunch in 2012. However, the fact that the opportunity to mine user data for advertisers was one of the reasons cited by media giant Time Inc when it bought Myspace in 2016, perhaps it is best not to rush to revive your Top Friends list just yet.
I’ve been blocked from Facebook for the third time this year for posts I made over three years ago! I’m sick of the way they are taking away our freedom of speech, they’ve done this to so many of my FB friends as well! I had to delete FB messenger because they wanted my billing information to download the latest version! FACEBOOK has become nothing but a place of censorship for Conservatives, I really need to find another alternative but with so many to choose from I don’t know which one to use, any suggestions.
It’s an interesting system that is flawed in a few ways. First off, Minds user base isn’t quite large enough to really incentivize you to reach as many users as possible via tokens. As such, you’re still kind of better off using your promotion time on Twitter and Facebook. Even if your content gets sucked into the void, it still feels like you’re getting more attention on popular platforms.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.
Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
We’ve talked about how great VSCO is before, but it deserves another mention here. VSCO is a community of creatives from all over the globe coming together to connect and share their work. Aimed at people with a keen interest in photography, this platform attracts photographers working at a high level, so the work you’ll see here is of a great quality and is bursting with innovation.

Swipe for Facebook is a replacement for both Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger, in case you need both in one. The Chat Heads functionality is still available in this app, in case you’re a fan of that, while PiP video functionality is also included, so that you can watch videos while you’re browsing your Facebook feed. This app allows you to sort your news feed by Most Recent, if you want, while the app is available in a ton of language, similar to Fella for Facebook.
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.

Phoenix is an app that can replace both your Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger applications. This app supports custom layouts and themes, while the same can be said for voice calling as well. Chat heads feature is supported by the application, and the developer has made a custom photo viewer for the application, and the same can be said for a video player as well. This app also offers a familiar design which has been somewhat adapted by the developer, of course, for the better.
If you use Facebook for those purposes, you should check out NextDoor, the local social network Why You Need to Be on Nextdoor, the Local Social Network Why You Need to Be on Nextdoor, the Local Social Network Nextdoor is a free, private, local social network for people that live in a neighborhood. And it's probably the best social network you haven't joined yet. Read More . Aside from the security benefits, it’s much more suited to community use that Facebook. It’s the best community-driven Facebook alternative.
The platform is a community-owned social networking platform that rewards its users for their activity online, similar to the Steemit platform.  They do this with paying users in crypto and providing users with more views on their posted content. Minds will monitor each users daily contribution and relative to the community. The amount a user gets will be determined by their percentage across the network which then determines their share of the Daily Reward Pool of tokens.
When you log into MeWe, you’ll be taken to your homepage, which operates much like a Facebook newsfeed. (This story originally said you would be taken to a MyWorlds page, but that was actually in an older version of MeWe. The new version has a homepage with a newsfeed.) On the homepage, you’ll see posts by all your friends, a photostream, and a chat box where you can talk to people. MeWe also has groups you can join and an Events feature too. You have a notifications icon at the top of the page too, to let you know if any activity has happened related to your posts.  Here is what the homepage looks like on dekstop:
The platform Diaspora is a social world online that puts your data back in your own hands, according to its own slogan. Its range of functions is similar to those of Facebook. Users can publish status updates, share posts and images, and comment on other people’s posts. And just like on Facebook, you can control who gets to see your own posts as well. Diaspora uses hashtags to order posts, meaning that you can use these to find like-minded people who share your interests. Linking Diaspora to your Facebook profile is also possible, and the software has its own chat function. Diaspora is also an open source project.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.
The recent purge and exodus from Facebook was timed quite well, considering Steemit’s recent changes that make it faster for people to join the network. David Jefferys, Business Development Manager for Steemit, said about the timing: “Steemit is open for business and the timing couldn’t be more perfect with the fragmentation and disenfranchisement pervading the major social media networks.” 

I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Since its founding in 2012, the operators of Ello have taken on a challenging task: they want to establish Ello as the leading, ad-free alternative to Facebook and other social platforms. This means that they’ll avoid personalized advertising at all costs. With Ello, there’s absolutely no forwarding of user data for advertising purposes and that isn’t likely to change. The platform is financed by a freemium model that involves the exchange of individual functions for small payments. There’s no official data about the number of users currently on the Ello network, but various sources range from 1.5 million to 4 million registered users, although the number of active users is assumed to be relatively low.

Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
Monitor what people are saying online about your market, brand, product/service and competitors. Generate leads and increase sales through social media by connecting to people at their point of need. Organically market your product on social media by participating in conversations with your potential customers, existing customers and influential opi… Read more about Beevolve

LinkedIn has been a popular platform for professionals and it continues to remain so. LinkedIn gives you the ability to interact with other professionals, recruit employees and find jobs. It’s also great if you want to be up to date on the latest business and industry news. There’s also LinkedIn Pulse if you want to share new ideas with other big names of the industry.
But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
Jolyn, I agree with you wholeheartedly. This very same thing has happened to me. This will be the 4th time. I already started 3 times, and my friends can still see there are 3 more FB’s that belong to me out there. I don’t feel right about sending any more info. It all seems wrong… Come to think of it, Because I was hacked, then why would I want to use that same one anyway…I wish there was an alternative to fb.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
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