We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
Musical.ly isn’t for adults, at least that’s what the main media would tell you. The platform targets 13-18 years old, although there has been a consistent debate if an app like Musical.ly is appropriate for that age group or not. However, Musical.ly, despite its target age group, provides a very functional social media platform. It has its own powerful artistic expression, which is both unique and sticky viral in nature.
Twittelator Neue is pure eye candy. There's a new wave of apps that are trying out new layering effects and physics, new animations and interactions. Twittelator Neue is one of those leading the way. This is not Apple's Twitter client. It's not flat and utilitarian like Mail or overly skeumorphic like Find my Friends. It's glossy, it's polished, it's fresh, and it's refreshing.

Jolyn, I agree with you wholeheartedly. This very same thing has happened to me. This will be the 4th time. I already started 3 times, and my friends can still see there are 3 more FB’s that belong to me out there. I don’t feel right about sending any more info. It all seems wrong… Come to think of it, Because I was hacked, then why would I want to use that same one anyway…I wish there was an alternative to fb.


This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.

Now to Steemit. They claim to prevent spammers from posting excessively they limit your posts. Want to upload and share some photos or maybe use the connected DTube ,YouTube alternative, to upload a video go right ahead. You will quickly be silenced and forbidden from posting any further unless you are willing to pay. If you become popular this will go away some due to the fact that you will get more people liking your content and it will give you more “steem power” so much like high school if you are popular you can share your opinion, but if you are not be prepared to pay if you want to comment on that post. This along with the fact that 80-90% of the content is about crypto currency and people talking about Whales while telling minnows to shut up and a two week wait to even set up your account bored me very quickly. It is a horrible platform for anyone other then those who want to eat, think, dream, and talk about crypto 24/7 and who are willing to wait ages to be popular enough to talk about it freely.
Metal for Facebook is actually an app that can replace both your Facebook and Twitter apps. This app allows you to set a “Metal Bar” in your notifications shade, so that you can access it at any time. Push notifications and themes are supported by the app, while the application itself weighs only 3MB. A special theme for OLED displays is included here, while this app also allows you to secure it via a password or your fingerprint.

If Gab doesn’t taste like your cup of coffee with its conservative undertoned discussion on alt-right topics, Mastodon could be your next social networking home. It is an open source Twitter alternative where you have complete control over your news feed and conversations. Since it is an open source platform, it gives you the freedom to set up your own little social media platform based on your set of interests.
There’s a bit of a barrier to entry, but it’s not that tough. If you need help signing up, there’s a great beginner’s guide here. Madeline Stone, who oversees public relations for Steemit, shared some advice on getting started on Steemit with Heavy.com. She advised:  “As far as helping people who are joining Steemit for the first time, posting in the introduceyourself tag is a great way to get started — other Steemians will then comment on your post and provide resources for newbies. People can also look for help by posting questions in the #help channel at https://steem.chat/home.”
External companies are also looking at reining in the data that Facebook has access to. Mozilla, which makes the Firefox web browser, has just launched a Facebook Container Extension (a downloadable plug-in) that prevents Facebook from tracking you across other websites. Other plug-ins, such as Ghostery for Google’s Chrome browser (also available for other browsers) and Facebook Disconnect 2016, offer their own tracker-blocking features.
Today's Twitter calls to mind the plot of Ghostbusters 2: It's a digital sewer of negativity slime we're all wading through. With the company's fortunes tied directly to user count, there's little incentive to purge bad actors or even those who break Twitter's own rules, especially if they're famous enough. In this case, I did what the Ghostbusters might do—I broke with the establishment and took things into my own hands. I (mostly) left Twitter, and joined Mastodon.
Ning lets you create your own social network (or blog, or website) around the topic you care about. Share your ideas, raise awareness, and find people who care about what you care about. Customize the look and feel of your network – with coding knowledge needed – then use it as a hub for fundraisers, events, and more. Ning lets you use an existing social profile (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.) to sign up and join networks. While Ning is far more customizable than many other private social networks, the idea of building a network from scratch can be daunting. While Ning heavily promotes monetization of your blog, website, or social network, you’ve got to spend money to make money; bigger projects can cost $49 or $99 per month.
Offiria is a an enterprise social network built to improve communication and collaboration among team members. Key features of the open source software include file management and sharing, task tracking and work milestone management. Maxamize productivity by providing a social space for your team to collaborate and share ideas, information and k… Read more about Offiria
For more general news that can delight and surprise, try Digg, an aggregation site that prioritizes deeply reported features on a range of topics as well as lots of fun and quirky news stories. And of course, iPhone and iPad owners can always just fire up Apple News if they don't want to bother setting up a whole new system. None of those fit the bill? Here's a deeper look at Facebook News Feed alternatives.
And if all else fails, there is always the option to revisit old social haunts. Myspace still exists, albeit as a mish-mash of pop-culture news and dormant profiles of friends who have not logged in since its relaunch in 2012. However, the fact that the opportunity to mine user data for advertisers was one of the reasons cited by media giant Time Inc when it bought Myspace in 2016, perhaps it is best not to rush to revive your Top Friends list just yet.
Friendster (a portmanteau of “friend” and Napster) launched in March 2002. It was the most popular social network until April 2004, when MySpace (which premiered January 2004) surpassed it. In July 2005, Newscorp purchased MySpace for $580 million, and by 2006, MySpace not only was the most popular social network in the US, it was the most visited website in the US. Interestingly, Twitter launched in 2006 and tripled in size by 2007 (the year of the first “retweet” and the first #hashtag).
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
500px has long been popular with the photography community with it's clean approach to photo sharing. No hashtags muddle this pond, 500px is all about sharing great work. Curated collections are excellent and regularly updated, whilst the Exif data upload is a nice touch to delve into the technical workings in-camera (Flickr also has this function). There are plenty of similarities with Flickr in terms of it being a platform angled towards promotion of the best creative work rather than popular accounts and sponsored posts.
That said, it's good at what it does, the product is sound, it's the aura around it that's misplaced. That and the fact that it's been dangled in front of Android users for far too long only to culminate in an arguably unfinished version (no tilt-shift? really?) when it was teased as "in some ways, it's better than our iOS app," according to one of the app's founders. Combine the aura that and the fact that so many iOS users don't want you playing in their sandbox anyway and it's worth looking at some alternatives.
App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
I’m having a similar problem with Facebook. I have an assistant who was supposed to conduct a Facebook campaign for me; she still hasn’t started but in the meantime, she told me she couldn’t conduct the campaign unless I gave her my Facebook log-in info., which to my sorrow I gave to her. Now, I can’t get into my Facebook account. They’ve asked for documents to prove who I am and, like you, I don’t like the invasion of privacy. They have a second level of documents that they will supposedly accept, such as library cards, professional membership cards, and health insurance cards which don’t have the kind of personal information that I am unwilling to share. When I sent them these, they e-mailed me to say I hadn’t sent the kinds of documents they require (untrue) and when I e-mailed them in response, well, they have not responded to me and I am still locked out of my account. BIG BUMMER. I also don’t like the uses that Facebook has allowed, such as influencing elections and recently, allowing the U.S. government to pursue certain types of suspected mis-deeds through Facebook. When/if I can get back in, I am very seriously considering deleting my Facebook account and finding an alternative.
SlimSocial for Facebook is one of the lightest Facebook alternative apps, it weighs less than 400KB, and it’s free to use. This app does not come with ads, at least not its own, you will see Facebook’s feed ads, though. The design is quite simple, reminiscent of the mobile Facebook app, and the app works really well, even though the developer notes that the app is in development, and that some features may not work as intended. This is a final version of the app despite what the developer's note says, so feel free to try it out.
Mastodon is decentralized and open to all kinds of people. It is closer to Twitter than it is to Facebook. It doesn't seem to attract the alt right like other Facebook alternatives do. I love the interface. It is very well structured and even though you join up for only one instance, you can interact with the whole world! Guest • Apr 2018 • 3 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Believe it or not, there are plenty of social networks and messaging apps that you can use instead of Facebook. For years these networks and apps have been living in the shadows of the mighty beast that is Facebook. But now is the time to explore a better way of interacting with friends and family without the fear of your data being stolen and stored on huge servers in far flung places.
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
It has a thumbs down, which FB users asked for but never got, instead, they got the already existent and simple to do emojis. Minds has so far been a place that I am interested in checking in on because the content is diverse in the way newsfeeds used to be before filtering. I find new content and opinions with each visit to the site and the creator is active in the community, sharing, upvoting, and updating users frequently. BadBlackSheep • Mar 2017 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
I’ve been blocked from Facebook for the third time this year for posts I made over three years ago! I’m sick of the way they are taking away our freedom of speech, they’ve done this to so many of my FB friends as well! I had to delete FB messenger because they wanted my billing information to download the latest version! FACEBOOK has become nothing but a place of censorship for Conservatives, I really need to find another alternative but with so many to choose from I don’t know which one to use, any suggestions.

The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
This is the only app that you have to pay for on our list, but according to the creators you’ll be treated as a priority rather than a product because of this. There’s a 14 day free trial available so you can play around with the features on offer, but if you want to be part of their community it’ll cost you between $47.88 per year for the basic package and $359.88 per year for the business package which provides you with all the tools you need to make your account a professional, client friendly portfolio.
Everything from photos and messages to mobile phone numbers of everyone in your phone. They also have all your text messages you’ve made on your cell phone! It’s crazy how much they have. And with the recent Facebookl CA scandal, people are now looking for alternatives to Facebook where privacy is respected and private information is never shared or sold to other companies or organisations.
With EyeEm you can take photos in the app or import them from your camera or phone. You can then edit and apply filters, as you’d expect, and add tags to help other users and potential buyers find your work. We love the EyeEm Selects feature, which scans your images and picks the shots that have the highest score according to their aesthetics algorithm. This safe and private tool makes it easier to work out which images are sellable, which in theory makes it easier for you to make money.
Trolls, haters, racists... are on every social network. Gab also have racists. Mastodon blocks nazis and allows you to create your own social network. The best alternatives to social media are web hosting sites, blogs, file uploading and file mirroring websites and link bookmarking websites. They don't store too much personal data and there is no trolls, spammers and haters.
Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
I’m having a similar problem with Facebook. I have an assistant who was supposed to conduct a Facebook campaign for me; she still hasn’t started but in the meantime, she told me she couldn’t conduct the campaign unless I gave her my Facebook log-in info., which to my sorrow I gave to her. Now, I can’t get into my Facebook account. They’ve asked for documents to prove who I am and, like you, I don’t like the invasion of privacy. They have a second level of documents that they will supposedly accept, such as library cards, professional membership cards, and health insurance cards which don’t have the kind of personal information that I am unwilling to share. When I sent them these, they e-mailed me to say I hadn’t sent the kinds of documents they require (untrue) and when I e-mailed them in response, well, they have not responded to me and I am still locked out of my account. BIG BUMMER. I also don’t like the uses that Facebook has allowed, such as influencing elections and recently, allowing the U.S. government to pursue certain types of suspected mis-deeds through Facebook. When/if I can get back in, I am very seriously considering deleting my Facebook account and finding an alternative.
Periscope is popular as a live web video broadcasting platform that supports all popular mobile devices. This Twitter owned application has creating great market value within very less time and today it is competing against Meerkat with all potential feature updates. It allows users to get connected with ease and they can immediately start sharing interesting broadcasts. All broadcasts can be accompanied with instant notifications and viewers can update comments when they like a new update. The best feature of Periscope is those lovely hearts that viewers can update to broadcasts when they like. These hearts are same as the like button on Facebook platform. In case if you have missed any update on your account then Periscope allows easy replay options. It is also possible to rate content as private or public so that only desired viewers can watch it.
GAB is a NO CENSOR zone by them, but if you want to control your feed you can censor yourself. You can share from GAB your videos or go live anywhere and anytime. There are many groups or start one for yourself. Post premium content and build subscribers if you want. Follow many sites and people and comment or up/down vote content. And you can control your feed. If something shows up that you do not want mark as spam or mute. Works great. Guest • Sep 2018 Disagree   Agree
Periscope is popular as a live web video broadcasting platform that supports all popular mobile devices. This Twitter owned application has creating great market value within very less time and today it is competing against Meerkat with all potential feature updates. It allows users to get connected with ease and they can immediately start sharing interesting broadcasts. All broadcasts can be accompanied with instant notifications and viewers can update comments when they like a new update. The best feature of Periscope is those lovely hearts that viewers can update to broadcasts when they like. These hearts are same as the like button on Facebook platform. In case if you have missed any update on your account then Periscope allows easy replay options. It is also possible to rate content as private or public so that only desired viewers can watch it.
It’s not exactly a secret that the official Facebook app is not battery friendly, and luckily for all of us, there are some alternatives out there. Of course, Facebook’s other official app, Facebook Lite, comes to mind, and is a good alternative, but if you’re not a fan of Facebook Lite either, and are looking for a third-party alternative, we’re here to help. In the list provided down below, you will be able to find 10 applications which can replace Facebook and Facebook Lite applications. Now, it is worth noting that all of these apps are more or less mobile site wrappers, but they’re all skinned in one way or the other, altered by the developer, so that they feel completely different. These apps have evolved quite a bit in the last couple of years, so if you’re interested in testing them out, check out the list down below, but before you do, please do not that these apps are not listed in a specific order.
One word of warning: Many dating apps require Facebook integration to work, meaning you won't be able to use them if you delete your account. You can still create a Tinder account without Facebook, but you will loose all your current matches and conversations. Hinge and Bumble require you to have a Facebook account to sign up, though the latter company says it's working on dropping that requirement.

App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.

Unfortunately, while I prefer apps like EyeEm (and I'm curious to check out Steller), the real reason that Instagram works for marketing is that it's also used by people who aren't photographers. So while you might be building a decent following on flickr or 500px, it's other photographers, who probably won't be looking to hire you to shoot their campaign/wedding. If on the other hand you're looking to make a name for yourself doing workshops/training for other photographers then maybe they're a perfect place to market yourself.
A press release about the change, which was just implemented at the end of September, reads that this is “a software upgrade that will take the Steem blockchain from its current bandwidth system to a new system based on Resource Credits, or RCs. This upgrade will enable Steem DApps to create free accounts, making it easier than ever to onboard new users and cementing Steem’s lead as the blockchain with the lowest barriers-to-entry… Hardfork 20 also improves user experiences on Steem by enabling unlimited post editing on steemit.com, allowing curators to vote on a post within 15 minutes of it being published (a change from 30 minutes) and putting more rewards back in the hands of curators by removing an unfair advantage that self-voting authors had.”
The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?

Look familiar? We originally published this post shortly after Facebook's acquisition of and the Android launch of Instagram. We were concerned then about the influence Facebook would have on it, and now it's borne fruit in the form of an invasive terms-of-service agreement. The agreement gives Instagram rights to and ownership of your photos to sell and use in ads as they see fit. Sure, you probably don't care if they sell that photo of your coffee foam, but you and your friends may care if they sell photos of your faces or likenesses to a company that uses your shot in their ad material. Unfortunately, at this stage the only way to opt-out is to close your account and move to another service, like some of these great alternatives.


There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.


Imgur is one of the best alternatives to Instagram to share your images over the internet by just after a simple sign up. According to the stats, everyday Imgur is used by the millions of peoples with different Goals, some came to be entertained, some came here to share their masterpiece &  build connection and other came with other motives to this one of the best photo sharing site “Imgur”.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.

Tweetlist offers an excellent way to view lists and quickly switch between them. The Tweetlists tab is quick to access and you simply swipe left and right to view different lists. This client is very snappy and has excellent Voice Over accessibility support. Tweetlists also offers support for Twitlonger, Instapaper, and Read it Later. Another fantastic feature of Tweetlist is that conversations open automatically - if a tweet is part of a conversation, the entire conversation will be displayed upon tapping on the tweet.


Instagram's real appeal is the closed nature of its product—the fact that it's walled off by default, with no open browsing of user photos by just anyone, and before its Android release, built a brand off of being iPhone only, private, and that thing that a select few used to take photos on their phone and then, for fear that no one would see it, pushed it over to Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, or anywhere else that people actually hang out. Aside from design and marketing, there's little that makes the app special to this writer. (Your view may differ, and if so, that's cool. You should use Instagram!)


You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.
It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
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