But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
Flickr has strong organization tools for your images, being able to bring together collections into "Albums" rather than having just one feed. Flickr also has a "Groups" section that are open-sourced public albums. This is a nice way to find collections of images of similar topics, themes, gear, or geography, but these "Groups" are too often messy, unfiltered, and unorganized.
SteamZoo has long been touted as a great—if not better-alternative to Instagram, partially because of the way it turns editing and sharing your photos into more of a social game that's addictive to play. You can earn badges—much like FourSquare—for sharing photos, adding effects and borders, or even for taking pictures of specific subjects, like your dog or your dinner. Whether you encourage the behavior or not, StreamZoo is a pretty addictive app to use.

Not just Facebook but Twitter as well. What I see unfolding in front of my very eyes is an evolutionary process still in beta that is already much superior to both of the above. Complex but clean, fast growing yet still user friendly and last but not least, the community feels real. They talk about important things instead of pretending to be celebs. I sense an intellectual depth ib the Minds community. Cheers Minds!! AJ JPS andrew_jjps • Apr 2017 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree

I have an animal rescue and we’ve been using facebook to communicate within our volunteer group. The algorithm has gotten ridiculous. I don’t get notifications about posts for 10+ hours. Even if I scroll the group page, I’m not shown everything posted there. Facebook is great for getting the word out about animals looking for homes, but it’s becoming unusable as a work/volunteer group tool. We’re currently looking for a new place to call home. Looking forward to checking these suggestions out.

One of the main features that Diaspora prides itself on is its decentralization. This is to do with its technical background: the platform consists of many different networks, known as pods. User data isn’t collected and stored centrally by the provider, instead the infrastructure is distributed by users themselves, with data carried by these so-called pods. If you have good technical know-how, you can actually operate your own pod, which essentially functions as a server. This means that you can be certain that your private data remains private and in your own hands. Less technically gifted users can use ‘open pods’ in the network instead.
Another interesting Instagram alternative is called Twitter. This is an online social networking platform where people can connect with others by making use of short content messages called Tweets. Many celebrities and famous personnel are using this app, where you can easily follow them and learn their stories by following their main account. Aside from that, you can also create your own tweets and share photos with your friends. This platform also offers some of the available filters that you can also find in Instagram. Moreover, Twitter on iPhone has a built-in editor for photos that is an additional super function.
Osfoora is a lot like the official Twitter for iPhone app was before the recent changes in version 4.0. That is to say, anyone who liked the original Tweetie will be immediately familiar with most of Osfoora. But Osfoora doesn't just stick to conventions, it jams a lot more features in as well. There's everything from a "home screen" with big icons for major functions to unread badges on the major sections.
GitHub is a network for programmers, where developers can take help to develop their projects better. It provides tools for your programming needs along with codes you can fork for your own project. You can also choose to not make your code public but that requires a paid subscription. There’s also issue tracking, code reviews and more. If you would like to use something other than GitHub, there are a number of good alternatives.
Facebook’s ongoing security and privacy issues 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare Facebook is no longer the king of the social media castle. If you value your anonymity, security, and privacy, here are some great reasons to quit Facebook today. Read More mean young people are leaving in their droves. According to Pew Research, 44 percent of users aged 18 to 29 said they deleted the app in the last year. Given they are also the demographic who are most likely to understand Facebook’s confusing privacy settings (64 percent), this is all rather worrying.
Some argue that the only reason Twitter is holding onto 330 million users is because the 45th POTUS uses the platform. But Donald Trump isn’t the worst person on the social network. Trolls, extremists of all political and religious persuasions, terrorists, criminals, mob rule and partisanship… and then there’s virtue signaling celebrities, splitting their audience with a typical lack of self-awareness.
Here is one more social networking application for you all that assists in mobile based instant messaging. Snapchat is growing at faster pace these days and standout like a big competitor against Facebook and Instagram etc. Using this mobile application, you can easily share media content with your friends over network. And it gets disappeared within few seconds when your friend has gone through it. Many people love to use this application due to additional advantage of chat disappearing feature as it keeps their conversations secret. If you are not familiar with Snapchat then it is right time to get it downloaded on your portable device and start enjoying. You can also find many tutorials online that provide step by step guidelines about how to get started with Snapchat.

@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.

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