At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
If you are a professional photographer or even a budding one, 500px is the place you should visit more often instead of Facebook. 500 px is a very strong photography community and along with interaction with other photographers, you will get to see some amazing pictures. The website also brings various tools and features for photographers. you can also check out other alternatives if you have some disliking to 500px.
The annual fee, however, is intended to help out the developing company, Vero Labs, by being its main source of income. The idea is for the platform to remain free of advertising in the long run and not to share any user information to make a profit. In addition, the company wants to generate revenue through transaction fees that merchants have to pay when selling products through Vero and implementing the 'buy now' button.

I'm in the same boat. I'm as conservative as they come, but I was alarmed at all the racism and anti-Semitism over there. I started muting users over there (you can't completely block them) but now I'm realizing it may be just too hard. It's a shame since I would like to see a good Twitter alternative emerge in the future. Right now, Twitter is just too ingrained into our culture to be removed quite so easily.

The Tumbler's editorial policy prevents open support for suicide or any form of self-harm, but it doesn't place any other hard restrictions on the platform's users. The visual nature of platform makes it a perfect tool for promotion of products and services.  Tumblr is much more than a simple platform that lets you create photo and video collections because it provides the tools necessary for the online promotion of brands.
Vero lets you share photos and video just like Instagram, plus it lets you talk about music, movies or books you like or hate. Though Vero has been around since 2015, its popularity surged in recent days, thanks in part to sudden, word-of-mouth interest from the cosplay community — comic book fans who like to dress up as characters. That interest then spread to other online groups.
Kristijan has been writing for Android Headlines since 2014 and is an editor for the site. He has worked as a writer for several outlets before joining Android Headlines, and has a background in writing about Android and technology in general. He is a smartphone enthusiast that specializes in Android applications, and that platform in general. Contact him at Kristijan. [email protected]
Instagram's popularity with photographers is incomparable. What is essentially a free portfolio building app disguises itself as a powerful marketing tool to connect with prospective clients, but it suffers at times due to its sheer size and scope. Maybe you're bored of sieving through lame #goals and #inspiration posts, and want to know what mobile friendly alternatives are out there? Well folks, I'm here to tell you.
It’s not exactly a secret that the official Facebook app is not battery friendly, and luckily for all of us, there are some alternatives out there. Of course, Facebook’s other official app, Facebook Lite, comes to mind, and is a good alternative, but if you’re not a fan of Facebook Lite either, and are looking for a third-party alternative, we’re here to help. In the list provided down below, you will be able to find 10 applications which can replace Facebook and Facebook Lite applications. Now, it is worth noting that all of these apps are more or less mobile site wrappers, but they’re all skinned in one way or the other, altered by the developer, so that they feel completely different. These apps have evolved quite a bit in the last couple of years, so if you’re interested in testing them out, check out the list down below, but before you do, please do not that these apps are not listed in a specific order.
Diaspora is a nonprofit social networking platform similar to Instagram that you can share your status, images, and see other people’s comment on the material. This tool also ensures the users that it will not sell its member’s information to advertisers. However, unlike the other social networking programs above, it has few users. This program is not widely known in many countries.

In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
Steemit is still a work in progress, and new features are being added constantly. For example, Steemit recently changed many underpinnings of how the network operates in order to help onboard new users faster. (Sometimes there is a waiting period before a new account is approved.) Stone told Heavy: “Hardfork 20 is going to improve the account creation process and user experience (post editing and voting, specifically) on Steemit and other decentralized apps on the Steem blockchain.”
Hivebrite offers all the tools you need to build, manage, and engage a community. Customize how your interface looks, how users sign up, the information they can display on their profiles, how much access they receive, and which features (i.e., events, forums, messaging, or job board) you enable. Hivebrite offers solutions for education, professional networks, nonprofits, and more. Like Ning, the level of customization that Hivebrite offers is immense and may appear overwhelming at first.
Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.
Eyeem is the fastest growing photography sharing sites by the four members (Florian Meissner, Ramzi Rizk, Gen Sadakane, Lorenz Aschoff) launched in 2010 to provide a platform to the internet users to upload and publish their photos to get discovered by the relevant audience.  There is nothing unique about the Eyeem, it works same as the other popular images hosting site do.

Minds does a little bit of everything, and its open-source, privacy-oriented, community-owned platform has actually attracted quite a few users. It has most of the standard Facebook features – profiles, timelines, media sharing, messaging, etc. But it also has hints of Reddit and Medium.com, with its content curation features and emphasis on original blogging content (which can be monetized using the site’s cryptocurrency tools).
That said, it's good at what it does, the product is sound, it's the aura around it that's misplaced. That and the fact that it's been dangled in front of Android users for far too long only to culminate in an arguably unfinished version (no tilt-shift? really?) when it was teased as "in some ways, it's better than our iOS app," according to one of the app's founders. Combine the aura that and the fact that so many iOS users don't want you playing in their sandbox anyway and it's worth looking at some alternatives.
Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
One of the main features that Diaspora prides itself on is its decentralization. This is to do with its technical background: the platform consists of many different networks, known as pods. User data isn’t collected and stored centrally by the provider, instead the infrastructure is distributed by users themselves, with data carried by these so-called pods. If you have good technical know-how, you can actually operate your own pod, which essentially functions as a server. This means that you can be certain that your private data remains private and in your own hands. Less technically gifted users can use ‘open pods’ in the network instead.
I think that when using Instagram you have to let go of the "full glory" thought process, just as anyone who prints their images on a large scale would tell you that you cant see the real image on a computer screen. Instagram was designed for mobile platforms, it's geared more towards composition and story than technical perfection. One could argue that if your image relies on being seen larger and doesn't look any good on instagram, maybe your composition or story isn't strong enough. Do a google image search on "Gregory Crewdson" and look at the images as thumbnails, obviously his work is designed to be viewed on a much larger scale so you'll miss some of the subtitles, but even as thumbnails the images are strong.
The Zimbra platform provides a space for open collaboration and messaging, as well as online private social networking and community building among staff and clients. Zimbra Collaboration and Zimbra Community form the core of the Zimbra platform. Both products provide a range of communication and collaboration features including blogs, wikis, calend… Read more about Zimbra
Pickup for the app has been slow, and I'm sure this is disappointing for Polaroid, but I implore them to continue to update the app and promote this alternative take on social media. One obvious improvement would be the ability to upload Apple Live Photos to the service rather than only being able to use the in-app camera, thus limiting what you can upload to the present moment.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
Gab has started with a distinctive motive of promoting free speech, and still successfully manages to escape the rightist policies that rule the other social media networks. This is represented by its Pepe frog logo. The CEO of Gab, Andrew Torba aptly describes it as the ‘left-leaning Big social monopoly.’ Being a complete free speech platform has put Gab in a unique position, and also in troubles.
Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
As a Berlin startup, EyeEm has to follow German data protection laws, which are stricter than those in the USA. And the user-friendly presentation of data protection information on the network has also received great praise: Users have access to the full terms and conditions of the data uploaded to the site and how it will/won’t be used, but they also receive a simple, comprehensible summary of this.
SlimSocial for Facebook is one of the lightest Facebook alternative apps, it weighs less than 400KB, and it’s free to use. This app does not come with ads, at least not its own, you will see Facebook’s feed ads, though. The design is quite simple, reminiscent of the mobile Facebook app, and the app works really well, even though the developer notes that the app is in development, and that some features may not work as intended. This is a final version of the app despite what the developer's note says, so feel free to try it out.
Facebook has determined that they control thought, speech, and the right to sell your life to others. A syndicate of overreaching leftists! Opinion is just that. Everyone believes something in their inner most thought processes. The have the courage to share it, only to have the grimy boot of Facebook police squash their beliefs. All after they profit handsomely on your private life! Hate Facebook ,and wish there was a good alternative to what used to be a great social site. It is no longer. It is a thought control monster!

The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.
@Corvin Adkins: I completely agree. My team and I use Podio and the internal chat is useful for general communication. And even though it integrates with Slack, I don't want my team to have to switch between apps to chat. It would be counter productive. We would love to migrate to Clickup but wouldn't be able to until it had the current features that our team is using on Podio at minimum.
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