Something that makes SmugMug an excellent Instagram alternative is the ability to download entire galleries so they’re available offline for when your signal isn’t the strongest. This can be a lifesaver, especially if you’re using your account as a professional photographer. You can also share images directly from the app via SMS, email and social media, so it’s not limited to face-to-face sharing.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
It also has a desktop version, allowing you to sync messages between your computer and phone, just like on Messenger. Signal can import your contacts, so it's easy to start a thread with anyone you already have saved in your phone. Signal also has several additional security features that might come in handy if you're aiming to avoid surveillance, like the ability to set messages to delete after a certain amount of time. You can also use Signal to make voice and video calls, just like on Messenger. There are absolutely no advertisements, and the app does not collect your personal information.

Friendster (a portmanteau of “friend” and Napster) launched in March 2002. It was the most popular social network until April 2004, when MySpace (which premiered January 2004) surpassed it. In July 2005, Newscorp purchased MySpace for $580 million, and by 2006, MySpace not only was the most popular social network in the US, it was the most visited website in the US. Interestingly, Twitter launched in 2006 and tripled in size by 2007 (the year of the first “retweet” and the first #hashtag).
Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.
When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.
Back in the day, pundits and thought leaders liked to ask, “Is ____ a nightclub or a public utility?” The theory is that nightclubs go in and out of style, but you’ll pay for and use the electric company’s product forever. With roughly 2.6 billion users, Facebook is clearly a utility. No digital product has ever been this size. The company has to break new ground every day just to keep from collapsing under its own weight. That said, the public sentiment combined with the political climate has created, at least in a small way, a market for alternative solutions.

Unfortunately, while I prefer apps like EyeEm (and I'm curious to check out Steller), the real reason that Instagram works for marketing is that it's also used by people who aren't photographers. So while you might be building a decent following on flickr or 500px, it's other photographers, who probably won't be looking to hire you to shoot their campaign/wedding. If on the other hand you're looking to make a name for yourself doing workshops/training for other photographers then maybe they're a perfect place to market yourself.

Der Höhepunkt jedes CHAT der WELTEN-Projekts ist der CHAT – ein Austausch über digitale Medien, in der Regel durch Videokonferenzen, zwischen Partnern in Deutschland und dem Globalen Süden. So werden internationale Verflechtungen und globales Miteinander für alle Beteiligten unmittelbar erfahrbar. Zugleich vertiefen sie ihre Sprach- und Medienkompetenz.
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
One feature that’s specific to the business model for EyeEm is that users can offer their own photos voluntarily on the startup’s marketplace. EyeEm sells these images with stock licenses to Getty Images and other purchasers. Users then receive a share of the revenue generated. This means that EyeEm isn’t just a platform for displaying images – you can make money from them too. And it’s not just an incentive for the user to post as high-quality photographic content as possible: the social network itself requires this in order to finance its business through advertising.

We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
It’s an interesting system that is flawed in a few ways. First off, Minds user base isn’t quite large enough to really incentivize you to reach as many users as possible via tokens. As such, you’re still kind of better off using your promotion time on Twitter and Facebook. Even if your content gets sucked into the void, it still feels like you’re getting more attention on popular platforms.
I have had Twitter since 2008, never used it until this Winter when we did daily treks to another city for health treatments. The rotten weather, road closures and guess what, the cops use Twitter, hydro guys, the road guys, the weather guys, they all use Twitter, so I'm sticking with Twitter. I'm probably in the minority, but I use my phone for texting and communicating when necessary. Gave up my landline 3 years ago and have a good data plan (2 phones, one for me, one for hubs). Twitter it is!
Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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