Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
Twitter that started as the fastest growing microblogging platform almost about a decade ago seems to be dying with its lack of innovation and senseless censorship. Looking at the current stats, Twitter’s active users have been reduced to 330 million worldwide. The platform is struggling to keep its users interested. Over the past few years, it has introduced GIF and Video support, and other exciting features which were too late to introduce to Social Media. Twitter in current form seems to have no life, except for some tweets from Beyonce and Trump. It started from being an ordinary man’s social platform to a network where people sign up to read what their favorite celebrities are tweeting, and it is failing in that too, as all the celebrities are moving to better-structured platforms like Instagram. This has pushed the bluebird away from our lives and left us with no choice but to look for Twitter alternatives.
Offiria is a an enterprise social network built to improve communication and collaboration among team members. Key features of the open source software include file management and sharing, task tracking and work milestone management. Maxamize productivity by providing a social space for your team to collaborate and share ideas, information and k… Read more about Offiria

Each person also has a profile page, similar to Facebook’s, where you can add a cover photo, a profile photo, and status updates. You can also add fun little anecdotes on a sidebar, including what you’re eating, drinking, reading, watching, or quoting. In that sense, it’s a little reminiscent of the features some people enjoyed on MySpace. In the other sidebar, you can share bio details like your job, college, interests, and relationship status.
GLOBAL NO.1 - 30 YEARS AGO... Madonna is known for her blatant style- and taboo breaks. With the release of the lead single 'Like A Prayer' for the album of the same name, she came with really heavy guns: a 180 ° image turn-around from the blonde beast to a meekly brunette ... her music changed into an exalted, hymn-like and danceable sound with religious-controversial and provocative texts. But the big bone of contention was the music video, directed by Mary Lambert. It portrays Madonna as a witness to the murder of a girl by white supremacists. While a black man is arrested for the murder, Madonna hides in a church for safety seeking strength to go forth as a witness. The clip depicts a church and Catholic symbols such as stigmata. It also features a Ku Klux Klan-style cross burning, and a dream about kissing a black saint. The Vatican condemned the video, while family and religious groups protested against its broadcast. They boycotted products by soft drink manufacturer Pepsi, who had used the song in their commercial. The company canceled their sponsorship contract with Madonna, but allowed her to retain the fee. 'Like A Prayer' became, not least because of this rather unintentionally publicity through the condemnation of parent associations and church representatives, the world's biggest hit in 1989.
While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.

It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.

Gab is free of ads. Gives people chance to earn money by offering premium content. Does not track your every move in app. Does not censor you unnecessarily. Gives you option to mute user who try to troll you. Gab offers pro subscription which self-sustains the platform without any need of advertisers dictating the direction of development of site. Guest • Sep 2018 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree


With EyeEm you can take photos in the app or import them from your camera or phone. You can then edit and apply filters, as you’d expect, and add tags to help other users and potential buyers find your work. We love the EyeEm Selects feature, which scans your images and picks the shots that have the highest score according to their aesthetics algorithm. This safe and private tool makes it easier to work out which images are sellable, which in theory makes it easier for you to make money.
Ning lets you create your own social network (or blog, or website) around the topic you care about. Share your ideas, raise awareness, and find people who care about what you care about. Customize the look and feel of your network – with coding knowledge needed – then use it as a hub for fundraisers, events, and more. Ning lets you use an existing social profile (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.) to sign up and join networks. While Ning is far more customizable than many other private social networks, the idea of building a network from scratch can be daunting. While Ning heavily promotes monetization of your blog, website, or social network, you’ve got to spend money to make money; bigger projects can cost $49 or $99 per month.
Minds does a little bit of everything, and its open-source, privacy-oriented, community-owned platform has actually attracted quite a few users. It has most of the standard Facebook features – profiles, timelines, media sharing, messaging, etc. But it also has hints of Reddit and Medium.com, with its content curation features and emphasis on original blogging content (which can be monetized using the site’s cryptocurrency tools).
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
Another interesting Instagram alternative is called Twitter. This is an online social networking platform where people can connect with others by making use of short content messages called Tweets. Many celebrities and famous personnel are using this app, where you can easily follow them and learn their stories by following their main account. Aside from that, you can also create your own tweets and share photos with your friends. This platform also offers some of the available filters that you can also find in Instagram. Moreover, Twitter on iPhone has a built-in editor for photos that is an additional super function.

Instagram's real appeal is the closed nature of its product—the fact that it's walled off by default, with no open browsing of user photos by just anyone, and before its Android release, built a brand off of being iPhone only, private, and that thing that a select few used to take photos on their phone and then, for fear that no one would see it, pushed it over to Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, or anywhere else that people actually hang out. Aside from design and marketing, there's little that makes the app special to this writer. (Your view may differ, and if so, that's cool. You should use Instagram!)
Minds does a little bit of everything, and its open-source, privacy-oriented, community-owned platform has actually attracted quite a few users. It has most of the standard Facebook features – profiles, timelines, media sharing, messaging, etc. But it also has hints of Reddit and Medium.com, with its content curation features and emphasis on original blogging content (which can be monetized using the site’s cryptocurrency tools).

Ello, created as a more private, ad-free alternative to Facebook, exploded in popularity in 2014 at the height of the Facebook real-name policy controversy. It's since morphed into a more Pinterest-like social networking platform for creative people: artists, musicians, photographers, and more to build brand awareness and sell their wares. What hasn't changed, however, is that unlike other more popular networking sites, Ello never sells user data, shows ads, or enforces a real-name policy.
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.
I have always loved Facebook but lately they are removing some of my posts. I only share pictures if my family, and post things to make friends laugh, recipes, whats going on in my life and my feeling. I loved the memories feature, photos, being able to accessorize my page. I don’t know which direction to turn. I don’t post political issues because I feel we all have a right to there option.
2. Was ich nicht tue ist mich mit jeweils einen Acount zu begnügen. Mein Bedarf wäre eigentlich eher ein totale Unterschied zwischen Login in eine Plattform und deren Nutzung. So habe ich je nach Funktion 6 verschiedene identi.ca-Accounts und mehr als 10 verschiedene Blogs. Ich bin immer sehr verwirrt darüber, dass ich für jeden neuen Account eine neue Mailadresse brauche. D.h. ich trenne sehr stark Inhalte. Das ist nocht immer einfach, aber ich brauche das irgendwie. Das ist sowohl für die Abonnenten als auch für mich einfacher zu sortieren. So wie mehrere Ordner unterhalb einer IMAP‐​Inbox.
Ich habe eine Frage zum global chat. Bisher war es immer so, dass man durch Enter das Textfenster für den Global chat öffnet. Jetzt wird dadurch allerdings das Fenster für den local geöffnet. In den Settings steht, dass die Taste für den Local entweder Einfügen (insert) oder / ist. Auch diese Tasten rufen bei mir das Textfeld für den local auf. Nur gibt es jetzt für mich halt keine Taste mehr für den Global. In den settings kann man auch gar keine Taste für den Global belegen.
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