Before you jump into these Instagram alternatives, make sure you check out these great camera apps for Android and iOS The Best Camera Apps for Android and iOS The Best Camera Apps for Android and iOS There are some great camera apps out there for Android and iOS, and they can bring out the best in your smartphone photographs. Read More , learn how to take unique photographs 5 Tips to Help You Take Really Unique Photographs 5 Tips to Help You Take Really Unique Photographs Taking a photo is easy - it's making it stand out that's hard. Every great photo has something special about it, and that's what makes you stop and take notice. Read More , and perfect your selfies with these tips 8 Fundamental Selfie Tips for Taking Better Pictures of Yourself 8 Fundamental Selfie Tips for Taking Better Pictures of Yourself Anybody can take a selfie, but do you have what it takes to shoot a really great and flattering picture of yourself? That's a trickier skill to master—these selfie tips will help. Read More .
This is certainly an excellent alternative to Instagram, the main downside would probably be that highly saturated, HDR images seem to make up large proportion of curated lists which can lead users to be rather formulaic in their attempt to gain popularity on the site rather than being original. The reach to the masses is also no way near Instagram levels so some of your work is likely to be ignored completely.

Instagram is really best known for engaging the "hipster photo" scene, an appropriate term when you consider the irony involved in retro-looking images being produced digitally. Instagram's cheesy, low-grade filter effects, which some shutterflies simply abhor, let anyone with an iPhone or Android phone turn their photos back 40 years. And who could resist that slightly fuzzy 70s haze appeal (answer: anyone with an appreciation for photography as an artform).
Mastodon is decentralized and open to all kinds of people. It is closer to Twitter than it is to Facebook. It doesn't seem to attract the alt right like other Facebook alternatives do. I love the interface. It is very well structured and even though you join up for only one instance, you can interact with the whole world! Guest • Apr 2018 • 3 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
What about Ello or Diaspora? I have been getting kicked completely out of Facebook and I have had to delete my app several times. And I know that I have let my friends on Facebook know that I was looking for something outside of Facebook. My Aunt as well as a few others are looking too. But I told them as soon as I find something I would let them know. I don’t think I should be discriminated against for being conservative and this to is happening on Facebook as well.
While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.
Users can upload images and videos and use them to tell a story using various layout templates. If you want to tell a story with a series of images, you can then add new videos or images before sharing them. These images can then be seen in the ‘storyline’ feed along with any other stories that a particular user follows. Other users can like and comment on posts in the exact same way as on Instagram, and can also share them to other social media platforms: as can you.
Add Friends – Players can request friends by targeting them in game and confirming the request. The friend display name will always be the name of the character that created the friendship. Characters have a context menu option to refuse friend requests. Players can have up to 50 friends at a time. There is a 30 second delay between sending friend requests.
×