When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.

A truly transnational campaign. Ahead of May elections @EuroAlter will send 5 caravans to 15 countries to meet social movements, NGOs, and citizens initiatives. Another Europe is not something to aspire to. But something that already exists on the ground.https://transeuropacaravans.eu/?fbclid=IwAR1GD7vRt7N5NxrEEww87vgwdO9ugI3waHFo9klWiHb-HNcmiB6nv2P2D9s …
But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.

Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.


Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.

If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
Now to Minds. Minds doesn’t limit their posts or their speech this unfortunately encourages bots to share, like, and reshare everything to earn “minds coins.” There is a huge vietnamese community on minds and that is not a bad thing, but when vietnamese bots are sharing Nazi propaganda for likes it gets confusing very quickly. Yes that’s right I said Nazi! One of the largest demographics on Minds is the Nazi party. Be prepared to be called the worst things possible and read some of the worst hate speech known to man on even a flower photo. Minds considers this free speech so Nazi propaganda goes right up there with porn, transvestite porn, and a lot of swearing. Not to mention nobody ever comments on anything and if the do it’s like two words “nice pic.” Overall I truly can’t get behind minds it is filled with filth and hate and that is too bad because outside of its buggy confusing interface that requires both the mobile app and the web browser site to access all of the functions I kinda wanted to pull for it.
There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
Free speech supporters are going to love using Gab.ai, a social network that has had their mobile app banned from both Google Play and the App Store, for failing to comply with their policies on adult content. Be it as it may, Gab.ai still offers shelter to people who think that hate speech or non-art related public nudity is somehow okay in the public domain. However, you really have to look for unsavory content, and most of the posts on the platform are dedicated to memes, pop culture or art.
Friendster (a portmanteau of “friend” and Napster) launched in March 2002. It was the most popular social network until April 2004, when MySpace (which premiered January 2004) surpassed it. In July 2005, Newscorp purchased MySpace for $580 million, and by 2006, MySpace not only was the most popular social network in the US, it was the most visited website in the US. Interestingly, Twitter launched in 2006 and tripled in size by 2007 (the year of the first “retweet” and the first #hashtag).

Flickr also has a higher grouping called collections where albums can be grouped. I had two projects going in 2012, the Full Moon project and the Equinox/Solstice project. I grouped my monthly full moons into individual albums and for the Equinox/Solstice, spring, summer. fall, and winter had an album. The monthly full moon albums were grouped into the Full Moon collection, and the spring, summer, fall, and winter albums were grouped in the Equinox/Solstice collection.


@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
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