For those determined to exit the Facebook ecosystem, the best approach is more likely to be a patchwork of sites and apps that mirror individual features. Messaging is the easiest: apps such as Telegram and Signal offer messaging and group chats, as well as voice calls, with encryption to keep your communications private. Telegram even has a thriving collection of chatbots, similar to Facebook Messenger.
You can capture and edit images in the app, and there are plenty of filters on offer, but the main aim is to share your content. Followers can favorite your images and can also republish them, but there are no options for comments and there is less of a focus on winning ‘likes’. In fact, the amount of followers that every user has is hidden, so it’s a completely level playing field for novices and professionals alike. The ‘discover’ section of the app makes it easy to find and follow photographers, making it a great place to gather inspiration and broaden your photography skills.
Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.
One of the primary reasons to stay on Facebook is not to miss an invite to a party or other event. It's worth unpacking that notion in the first place: If your friend or family member doesn't realize you're not on Facebook, do they really value your presence at the event they're planning? If someone genuinely wants you somewhere, they'll find a way to invite you, Facebook or no.
Join Robert Holden on a 4-Day retreat with Alternatives in the beautiful Montserrat Monastery in Catalonia Spain - Spiritual Growth and the Enneagram - last few places left - 11th-14th April https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/spiritual-growth-the-enneagram-with-robert-holden-retreat-in-montserrat-monastery-2019-registration-54112401650 …pic.twitter.com/gjZHeV7puk
I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Secondly, there are regular competitions or "Missions" with specific briefs. Prizes come in various forms such as being published in an exhibition, having your work used in commercial campaigns, or cold hard cash. This is a great way for marketing teams of commercial brands or exhibition curators to hunt for new, enthusiastic talent. This gives any aspiring photographer the feeling that the playing field has been leveled, and if the quality is there, then you wont be ignored.
It's full of inspiration, it's clean and it's wonderfully simple to use. If you are looking for a unique way of to publish a collection of images and give them an editorial feel very quickly, Steller is the place to be. Steller has also been slow in building an active following, but much like SW/NG, I hope that the developers persist as there is certainly enough room in the market for well thought out image sharing apps like Steller.
Facebook kind of took the internet world by storm when it went global in 2006 and it is arguably the biggest social network now. We all have a Facebook account and it would be lying if anyone said they haven’t had one ever. Facebook has been loved so much by people and it continues to add new features in a bid to remain at the top of the social network world. But there are times when we get a little saturated by Facebook and want a new fresh alternative. Although the truth is, there are no worthy Facebook alternatives.
MeWe hasn’t gotten quite the coverage it deserves, especially given that Tim Berners-Lee, one of the primary architects of the World Wide Web, sits on its board of advisors. Its interface is simple and intuitive, it covers all the Facebook basics, and it is dedicated to maintaining user privacy. It has advertising, but it is not targeted. They compensate for lower ad revenue by selling add-on services, like voice messaging and message encryption. It’s quite user-friendly, and you may be able to connect your Facebook and Twitter to it, though if this feature currently exists, it’s somewhat well-hidden.

It’s early days for the app but it already has users from over 30 different countries, and there are thousands of photographers, media managers and content creators using Dayflash to share their aesthetic. We love the focus that Dayflash has on providing creators with a platform for their art, and because you can link your Instagram, the app is a nice way to get extra exposure if it’s still your go-to image sharing site.
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
It’s not exactly a secret that the official Facebook app is not battery friendly, and luckily for all of us, there are some alternatives out there. Of course, Facebook’s other official app, Facebook Lite, comes to mind, and is a good alternative, but if you’re not a fan of Facebook Lite either, and are looking for a third-party alternative, we’re here to help. In the list provided down below, you will be able to find 10 applications which can replace Facebook and Facebook Lite applications. Now, it is worth noting that all of these apps are more or less mobile site wrappers, but they’re all skinned in one way or the other, altered by the developer, so that they feel completely different. These apps have evolved quite a bit in the last couple of years, so if you’re interested in testing them out, check out the list down below, but before you do, please do not that these apps are not listed in a specific order.
Tweetbot is different. It’s innovative and refreshing. Tweetbot isn’t an app you use, it’s one you interact with. Everything has an animation, a sound, a beautiful interface. And true to Tapbots’ style, the sounds are subtle and pleasant – enriching the experience. For those who are suckers for design, innovation, and dare I say, personality, Tweetbot will rock your world.

The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?
Give plates a try , Plates allows you to create “Plates” and then share photos and videos with your friends, family, and the world. Users can allow others to be collaborators in their plates which allows them to add content in the Plates, as well. These plates allow for a unique experience when multiple collaborators come together. Create plates for your trips, ideas, projects or anything that floats your boat…. add some collaborators, and watch as your plate grows with unique content from all your publishers. There are 2 types of plates Public and Private .
Swipe for Facebook is a replacement for both Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger, in case you need both in one. The Chat Heads functionality is still available in this app, in case you’re a fan of that, while PiP video functionality is also included, so that you can watch videos while you’re browsing your Facebook feed. This app allows you to sort your news feed by Most Recent, if you want, while the app is available in a ton of language, similar to Fella for Facebook.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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