The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.

Instagram, owned by Facebook has grown over the past few years by leaps and bounds. It’s an all round social network, as it lets you upload photos, short videos and even exchange texts with others. The great thing is you can set Instagram to post your updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other profiles as well. Thanks to Instagram’s popularity, there has been a rise in various similar apps, which you can check out.
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This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.
Tweetbot by Tapbots is it a beauty. A text review can hardly do this app justice because it is impossible to put into words how beautifully Tweetbot is made. Sure, I can describe how, at your touch, a tweet slides up revealing a navigation bar while simultaneous emitting the perfect sound. I can explain that swiping a tweet to right reveals the conversation and swiping to left displays related tweets. I can tell you about smart gestures, multiple timelines, and customizable navigation. I can even spew out a concrete list of every feature that Tweetbot includes. What I can’t provide you, however, is the experience.
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..

This is certainly an excellent alternative to Instagram, the main downside would probably be that highly saturated, HDR images seem to make up large proportion of curated lists which can lead users to be rather formulaic in their attempt to gain popularity on the site rather than being original. The reach to the masses is also no way near Instagram levels so some of your work is likely to be ignored completely.

Gab has started with a distinctive motive of promoting free speech, and still successfully manages to escape the rightist policies that rule the other social media networks. This is represented by its Pepe frog logo. The CEO of Gab, Andrew Torba aptly describes it as the ‘left-leaning Big social monopoly.’ Being a complete free speech platform has put Gab in a unique position, and also in troubles.


Instagram has nothing on Pixlr-o-matic when it comes to the number of effects, overlays, filters, and frames the app has to offer. Snap a photo within the app or choose from one already in your gallery. Pixlr-o-matic has more than two million possible outcomes, when you do permutations for all the filters, lighting effects, and borders options. And of course, you can share your photos to other sites and services, such as Facebook, imm.io, Dropbox, and Flickr.

With EyeEm you can take photos in the app or import them from your camera or phone. You can then edit and apply filters, as you’d expect, and add tags to help other users and potential buyers find your work. We love the EyeEm Selects feature, which scans your images and picks the shots that have the highest score according to their aesthetics algorithm. This safe and private tool makes it easier to work out which images are sellable, which in theory makes it easier for you to make money.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.

DeviantArt is the perfect platform for artists, who want to showcase their art galleries to the world. It has a great community of artists you can interact with and along with that you get to see some great art. There are a number of features that aim at making life easier for artists and moreover, it also makes sure the artists get their due credit.


Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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