The official Twitter 4.0 for iPhone has a radically overhauled user interface which, while it might potentially make tweeting more discoverable and approachable to new, mainstream users, could also annoy and alienate long time, power users. Luckily, if you're one of he annoyed, the alienated, there are a variety of alternative Twitter apps in the App Store for you to choose from. These are some of our favorites, the ones we consider the very best, most must-have third party Twitter clients for iPhone and iPad.
Oracle Social Cloud is a social media management and communication tool that serves multiple departments, including marketing, sales, customer service, and commerce. Oracle integrates its social media tools with a host of Customer Experience apps. Oracle enables marketers to generate awareness, drive demand and boost sales. Read more about Oracle Social Cloud
Plurk utilizes a horizontal timeline, with messages summarized by single verbs (“feels”, “loves”, etc.). As you would expect, media files can be shared, and Plurks can be liked. Emoticons are an important element of the Plurk user experience, and your selection increases as your karma grows. Karma is based on your activity on the social networking site. Group chat and direct messaging are also featured on Plurk.
Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Vero lets you share photos and video just like Instagram, plus it lets you talk about music, movies or books you like or hate. Though Vero has been around since 2015, its popularity surged in recent days, thanks in part to sudden, word-of-mouth interest from the cosplay community — comic book fans who like to dress up as characters. That interest then spread to other online groups.
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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