Diaspora is a nonprofit social networking platform similar to Instagram that you can share your status, images, and see other people’s comment on the material. This tool also ensures the users that it will not sell its member’s information to advertisers. However, unlike the other social networking programs above, it has few users. This program is not widely known in many countries.
Firstly, you can make all of your images available for purchase through the EyeEm app. EyeEm do this via Getty, take a handsome cut for the trouble, and you must have model and location releases as per other stock photography selling sites. But I must hand it to the EyeEm team, it is wonderfully simple to submit your photography for review to go on sale, and the app itself is enjoyable to browse.
@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
Musical.ly isn’t for adults, at least that’s what the main media would tell you. The platform targets 13-18 years old, although there has been a consistent debate if an app like Musical.ly is appropriate for that age group or not. However, Musical.ly, despite its target age group, provides a very functional social media platform. It has its own powerful artistic expression, which is both unique and sticky viral in nature.
It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
One feature that’s specific to the business model for EyeEm is that users can offer their own photos voluntarily on the startup’s marketplace. EyeEm sells these images with stock licenses to Getty Images and other purchasers. Users then receive a share of the revenue generated. This means that EyeEm isn’t just a platform for displaying images – you can make money from them too. And it’s not just an incentive for the user to post as high-quality photographic content as possible: the social network itself requires this in order to finance its business through advertising.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
Pros & Cons The Pros and Cons of using Twitter for your Online Marketing. Twitter is a social networking microblogging service that allows registered  pros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twittertwitter 280 characters pros and conspros and cons instagrampros and cons of twitter advertisingpros and cons of snapchatPeople also search for ...

Eyeem is the fastest growing photography sharing sites by the four members (Florian Meissner, Ramzi Rizk, Gen Sadakane, Lorenz Aschoff) launched in 2010 to provide a platform to the internet users to upload and publish their photos to get discovered by the relevant audience.  There is nothing unique about the Eyeem, it works same as the other popular images hosting site do.


SlimSocial is a newer Facebook app that keeps it wicked simple. Its claim to fame is its intensely small size (100KB), that it shows no ads, and that it’s open source so you can go view the source code and contribute to its development if you want to. Aside from that, there isn’t much to talk about. It'll be a little slow and clunky like many third party apps. It's not that bad, though. The developer has also expressed interest in adding new features down the road like background notifications along with more stuff. .

I have had Twitter since 2008, never used it until this Winter when we did daily treks to another city for health treatments. The rotten weather, road closures and guess what, the cops use Twitter, hydro guys, the road guys, the weather guys, they all use Twitter, so I'm sticking with Twitter. I'm probably in the minority, but I use my phone for texting and communicating when necessary. Gave up my landline 3 years ago and have a good data plan (2 phones, one for me, one for hubs). Twitter it is!
But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
The platform is a community-owned social networking platform that rewards its users for their activity online, similar to the Steemit platform.  They do this with paying users in crypto and providing users with more views on their posted content. Minds will monitor each users daily contribution and relative to the community. The amount a user gets will be determined by their percentage across the network which then determines their share of the Daily Reward Pool of tokens.
Are you on the hunt for a conservative Facebook alternative? While it may seem like a daunting task, you can rest assured you’re not alone. Whether it’s because of hidden terms and conditions, data protection issues, or platform rules and regulations – the reasons for finding an alternative to Facebook are common and more and more users are looking to avoid the Californian social media giant. The market for similar networks is massive, and there’s a large selection of platforms ready to accept Facebook’s digital refugees. In our guide, we’ve already introduced some of the biggest and most important social media platforms around.
As a Berlin startup, EyeEm has to follow German data protection laws, which are stricter than those in the USA. And the user-friendly presentation of data protection information on the network has also received great praise: Users have access to the full terms and conditions of the data uploaded to the site and how it will/won’t be used, but they also receive a simple, comprehensible summary of this.

The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
500px has long been popular with the photography community with it's clean approach to photo sharing. No hashtags muddle this pond, 500px is all about sharing great work. Curated collections are excellent and regularly updated, whilst the Exif data upload is a nice touch to delve into the technical workings in-camera (Flickr also has this function). There are plenty of similarities with Flickr in terms of it being a platform angled towards promotion of the best creative work rather than popular accounts and sponsored posts.

The two main ones I see are Micro.blog and Mastodon. Micro.blog is the more popular one right now, it seems, but Mastodon has its fair share of loyal fans. I personally have accounts with both other services, but I don’t really use them reliably. Mastodon because I can’t find anyone on there, and Micro.blog because I don’t like any of the iOS apps available for it.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
I think that when using Instagram you have to let go of the "full glory" thought process, just as anyone who prints their images on a large scale would tell you that you cant see the real image on a computer screen. Instagram was designed for mobile platforms, it's geared more towards composition and story than technical perfection. One could argue that if your image relies on being seen larger and doesn't look any good on instagram, maybe your composition or story isn't strong enough. Do a google image search on "Gregory Crewdson" and look at the images as thumbnails, obviously his work is designed to be viewed on a much larger scale so you'll miss some of the subtitles, but even as thumbnails the images are strong.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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